Solving the artichokes and wine pairing dilemma: try the Kogl Magna Domenica Albus

kogl-magna
Kogl Magna Domenica Albus
Why are artichokes so hard to pair with wine? The main culprit is cynarin, a chemical compound that changes the way our taste buds perceive flavors. After eating artichokes, many people experience extra sweetness in their food and drinks, while a few others may taste more bitter flavors.

My problem is that I love wine and I love artichokes, especially when signs of springs are starting to be seen all around. So the other night, I made one of my favorite spring recipes, pasta with braised artichokes, green beans, lima beans, and bacon lardons. As for the wine, I decided to try the Kogl Magna Domenica Albus 2009.

Home of the Cvetko family since 1820, the Kogl Winery is located in Northeastern Slovenia, not very far from the borders of Hungary, Austria, and Croatia. With a humid continental climate and prolongued freezing periods during wintertime, the region is famous for its white wines.

The Magna Domenica Albus (Latin for “Grand White Estate Wine”) is the winery’s flagship wine. It is a blend of Riesling, Yellow Muscat, and Auxerrois, aged in traditional big wooden barrels. The wine had a light golden color and a lively flowery nose. The palate was dry, refreshing with a good body, notes of citrus and peach, and a relatively low alcohol content. I served the pasta with a squeeze of lemon (which I think minimizes the effect of cynarin), a dash of cream, freshly grated parmesan, and ground black pepper. That made the wine taste even better, crisp, clean, aromatic, and not too sweet at all.

pasta-artichoke

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