#WineWednesday Spotlight #107: Gallay Bistronauta White

Through his blog The Paprika Project, Irish-born Colm FitzGerald, who now lives in Hungary, likes to share Hungary’s rich culture and natural beauty with the world. He recently met winemaker Roland Borbély at the Gallay Winery: Roland Borbély, the man with the plan! Beautiful morning in sunny Nyékládháza, Hungary with the whole Borbély family. Tucked away in a rural valley near Miskolc, Gallay is producing exceptional wines in an uncompromising style. Roland is championing Pinot Blanc, Zenit, Kékfrankos and Zweigelt grown on the clay and ancient limestone of the Bükk foothills. The results speak for themselves: elegant, balanced and age worthy wines that are unique yet very, very likable. @hunvino @bluedanubewine #gallay #hungary #bükk #wine #miskolc #bluedanubewine #winelover The Bistronauta White is a funny, flying astronaut on a bistro corkscrew. It’s a fruity blend of 60% Pinot blanc and 40% Zenit — a Hungarian crossing of the native Ezerjó and the Slovenian grape Bouvier. Aged in stainless steel and neutral oak barrels, the wine is fresh, very aromatic, and easy going. A great “bistro wine” and very likable indeed! Follow Colm Fitzgerald and the Paprika Project on Instagram .

Harvest report in Tokaj, Hungary: Interview with Samuel Tinon

This year, we decided to interview a few of our winemakers to get their impressions of the 2017 harvest and the overall 2017 vintage. We first reached out to Samuel Tinon on September 17th, just as some rain began to fall. Fortunately, the sparkling base wines and Sárgamuskotály (Yellow Muscat) had already been picked and most of his Furmint was still in early ripening. According to Samuel, “In Tokaj we can have up to 10 book chapters in a 2-month period. In these conditions, it is far too early to talk about vintage. Anything can happen. In a written book, from the first chapter you can get a idea of the book, with Nature not.” By September 21st, the weather had changed. Completely botrytis-free harvest had moved into botytris, or what Samuel would call “Tokaj premier grand cru only.” Sugar levels still good, acid starting to drop, but Aszú berries beginning to take shape. By September 25th, roughly 40 L/m2 of rain had fallen so it was time to harvest all the remaining botrytis-free grapes. All in all, and like all quality wine regions the world over, it’s impossible to have a recipe or a crystal ball. Best to end … Continue reading Harvest report in Tokaj, Hungary: Interview with Samuel Tinon

Harvest report in Carnuntum, Austria: Interview with Dorli Muhr

This year, we decided to interview a few of our winemakers to get their impressions of the 2017 harvest and the overall 2017 vintage. Here is Dorli Muhr, owner of the Muhr-van der Niepoort winery located in the Austrian appellation of Carnuntum east of Vienna, and known of her elegant Blaufränkisch wines: How would you describe the 2017 vintage? 2017 is a very diverse vintage. We see fantastic quality in some vineyards, and less interesting grapes in others. You will find outstanding wines from the 2017 vintage, and you will find quite poor wines. For the consumer and for the trade, tasting and comparing will be very important. How is this vintage different from last year’s? This year, we had a very hot and extremely dry summer, while in 2016 we had enough rain. The grapes were very balanced in 2016, very tasty, very relaxed in a way. In 2017, many grapes could not mature perfectly, because they did not get enough water. But for some vineyards, the hot summer and the rainfall we got finally in September, was just ideal. Those vineyards will make incredibly good wines. What’s the biggest challenge this year? We need to pick very carefully, … Continue reading Harvest report in Carnuntum, Austria: Interview with Dorli Muhr

New Kabaj vintage reviewed in Wine and Spirits Magazine

Wine and Spirits Magazine has great reviews of the latest vintage of Kabaj in its October issue. These wines will be coming to the US shortly. In the meantime, low quantities of the 2013 vintage—also very well rated by the magazine—are still available (93 Points for both the 2013 Rebula and the 2013 Sivi Pinot!).

#WineWednesday Spotlight #106: Bott Csontos Furmint

The historic Csontos vineyard—literally “strong-boned”—is a south-facing vineyard at the foothills of the oak-covered Zemplén mountains, a great protection against the cold northern winds. The soil, primarily tilled by horses, is a mix of clay and volcanic rocks, which provides spicy and mineral flavors to the Furmint grapes that Judit and József Bodó replanted a little more than 10 years ago. Judit Bodó, née Bott, ferments her Csontos Furmint slowly with native yeasts in used barrels. The result is a straw-colored wine that smells like honey, herbs and smoke. It’s mouth-filling and unctuous like an apricot compote, with just a touch of sweetness. You can find it on the menu of the recently opened San Francisco restaurant Parigo, paired with seared foie gras, warm salt and pepper cookies, and huckleberry jam. You can also find it on our webshop. Enjoy!

#WineWednesday Spotlight #105: Patricius Tokaji Aszú 6 Puttonyos

When conditions are just right, nature can hold a usually nasty fungus in such check that something special happens. Instead of destroying a crop, the fungus creates grapes with incredibly concentrated flavor that can make some of the world’s sweetest, most precious wines. The fungus, Botrytis cinerea, is more affectionately known as “noble rot.” writes Anne Krebiehl, MW in the current issue of Wine Enthusiast Magazine. And the Patricius Tokaji Aszú 6 Puttonyos 2006 is one of the best: Patricius 2006 Aszú Six Puttonyos (Tokaj); 95 points. Tantalizing aromas of apricot, bananas foster, beeswax and pineapple upside-down cake transfer seamlessly onto the palate. It then opens up further, with pronounced flavors of lemon meringue and acacia honey. The texture is luxurious, silky and voluptuous. Editors’ Choice. The wine is a sweet golden nectar, made from the best terroirs and only in exceptional vintages. Enjoy it with Foie Gras, Blue Cheese or an Apricot Tart.

The Rise of Blaufränkisch

It seems that in the last few years, Blaufränkisch (German for blue Frankish) has become Austria’s most successful red wine variety. It’s not a new grape: based on its name, we think that it had been growing in Central Europe since the Middle Ages. The name Fränkisch comes from Franconia, a German region praised for its quality wines in the Middle Ages, and so at the time, grapes that were producing superior wines were called Fränkisch. Better rootstock, denser plantings, better cover crops management and nuanced winemaking explain the recent rise in quality with more and more Blaufränkisch wines showing great complexity and finesse. Some producers describe Blaufränkisch using the “triangle” comparison: the grape has the elegance of Burgundy Pinot Noir, the pepperiness of Northern Rhône Syrah, and the structure of Piedmont Nebbiolo. Its home is Burgenland where many of the finest examples are grown. Carnuntum, a region just southeast of Vienna, is also a source of quality Blaufränkisch where they are especially fresh and elegant. Burgenland was part of Hungary until 1921, when most of it was annexed as Austria’s ninth and easternmost state after the dissolution of he Habsburg Empire. The exception was Burgenland’s capital Sopron, which was … Continue reading The Rise of Blaufränkisch

Cracking Croatian Wine: A Visitor-Friendly Guide

After four years of deliberating and planning together, in May 2015, Charine Tan and Dr Matthew Horkey sold almost all of their possessions, dropped the comfort and security of their lucrative careers, and left Singapore to travel around the world. With a dream of building a location-independent business and to absorb the world’s lessons, they have explored over 50 wine regions and published four books (three of them are wine related) along the way. Cracking Croatian Wine: A Visitor-Friendly Guide is the third in a series of ‘Exotic Wine Travel’ books that they plan to author. They also share wine travel tips, videos, wine-related stories, and exciting finds from lesser-known wine regions on exoticwinetravel.com, Facebook, Instagram, Twitter, and YouTube. When asked about the name ‘Exotic Wine Travel’, the duo explained that the problem with lesser-known wine regions and exotic wines is that, often, visitors bounce around a country swiftly and end up tasting some sub-standard local wines. Their experiences tend to be incidental and far from ideal. For that reason, Charine and Matthew aim to explore the unheralded wine regions of the world and introduce the readers to the best that those places have to offer. To achieve that, they … Continue reading Cracking Croatian Wine: A Visitor-Friendly Guide

#WineWednesday Spotlight #104: Shavnabada Rkatsiteli

Sierra Dawn Downey tells stories through illustrating, writing, and photography and teaches about wine. She recently attended a tasting of Georgian wines at The Barrel Room in San Francisco and was particularly fascinated by the Shavnabada Rkatsiteli, a rich amber-colored wine made by monks from the Shavnabada Monastery that spent 9 years buried in the earth after 5 months of maceration: Ever since listening to @winefornormalpeople’s episode on Georgian wines, I’ve been incredibly curious to try some for myself. Thanks to the intrepid wine gurus at @barrelroomsf, I was able to travel to Eastern Europe via its vino and dive into the world of amphorae wines! I can honestly say I’ve never quite experienced history on my tongue and in my nose as I did with this flight. When I tried the amber-colored Shavnabada Rkatsiteli, made by Georgian Orthodox monks in Kakheti who age it for years in qvevris, it brought to mind creaking old stone-and-wood buildings decorated with decades of dust. Tree resin, herbs, treated wood. It was fascinating. She also tasted the Gotsa Tavkveri and the doqi Saperavi: Then it was on to the Gotsa Rosé of Tarkveri, the color of a vivid sunset in my glass–with the … Continue reading #WineWednesday Spotlight #104: Shavnabada Rkatsiteli