#WineWednesday Spotlight #143: Toreta Pošip Special AKA Lobster Wine

“It’s no surprise my love for lobster runs deep,” writes New York City winemaker and blogger Caroline Shifflett. “I even did a whole post on lobster and the wines that love it! For my birthday this year, we hosted the 3rd annual lobster feed and I had just the right wine to serve!” The Toreta Pošip Special is so lobster friendly, it has even a lobster on its label! Pošip (pronounced poe-ship) is a grape that grows predominantly in the Dalmatian region of Croatia and is indigenous to the island of Korcula. The grape is capable of reaching very high sugar levels so it’s no small feat that this bottling is full of ripe fruit flavors but remains light and crisp. Perfect to drink with anything pulled from the sea! The “special” bottling is from younger vines from the Toreta property. Frano Banicević is the young winemaker of Toreta, a winery founded by his great grandfather. Today, he farms roughly 5 hectares of Pošip in Korčula’s Smokvica area, not far from Pošip’s birthplace. His wines are incredibly well-balanced and of course absolutely seafood-friendly. Try also his Pošip Premium, a fuller wine made from older vines, and his Pošip Sur Lie, … Continue reading #WineWednesday Spotlight #143: Toreta Pošip Special AKA Lobster Wine

#WineWednesday Spotlight #142: Piquentum Sv. Vital Malvazija

Charine Tan and Dr Matthew Horkey, the duo behind Exotic Wine Travel, have just released part 4 of their 4-part series about Istria. it’s a great video that will introduce you to Istria’s gastronomic treasures, the region’s wines from Teran and Malvazija, and a few organic winemakers including Dimitri Brečević from Piquentum. “Piquentum wines are made with little or no intervention,” narrates Matthew Horkey. “They’re fermented with native yeast. We’re usually fond of the Piquentum Teran and Refosk but today we’re very impressed by his Sv. Vital Malvazija. It’s a reserve wine made from vines over 40 years of age.” Malvazija Istarska is one of the oldest Croatian grape varieties. Being grown in the Istrian peninsula since the ancient Greeks, it produces fresh and mineral white wines of floral and citrus character. But the quality of Malvazija wines greatly depends on the terroir. Characterized by medium-deep red soil, the Sv. Vital terroir is rich in bauxite and planted with 40-year-old vines that are farmed organically. The climate is Mediterranean with hot and dry summers tempered by the sea. On the label, the dots represent the level of rainfall from October of the previous year to September, month of the harvest. … Continue reading #WineWednesday Spotlight #142: Piquentum Sv. Vital Malvazija

#WineWednesday Spotlight #141: An Homage to Anthony Bourdain

In April 2012, Antony Bourdain toured Croatia’s Istria and Dalmatia regions and literally got knocked off his feet as he is treated to the finest Mediterranean cuisine and wines. “Why are the wines so good here?” asks Antony Bourdain while tasting Alen Bibić‘s red blend R6. “Is this a restaurant?” he asks later after being served a delicate scallops dish topped with goat cheese paired with BIBICh R5. “What’s going on here, really?” After the meal, he will thank Alen’s wife Vesna, a trained chef, on his knees for this impromptu meal “of epic quality accompanied by equally epic wines.” Let’s raise a glass of BIBICh wines in memory of Tony. Here is a moving homage from our friend and New York based sommelier and Wines of Croatia founder Cliff Rames: https://www.instagram.com/p/Bjx87sSBsTb/?hl=en&taken-by=cliff_rames And also from our friend wine writer and Founder – Writing Between the Vines Marcy Gordon: The sun sets on another day—let’s seize the moment while we can. Pay the debt with Debit. Pouring one for Mr. Bourdain tonight—cheers to the explorers who seek out great adventure and wine in life. I love the many expressions of Debit, an indigenous grape of Croatia. Alen Bibić knows how to … Continue reading #WineWednesday Spotlight #141: An Homage to Anthony Bourdain

Border(less) Regions are Great for Wine

Take a good dose of nationalism, a slightly larger dollop of history, and fuse it with taking the best from what’s around you and creating something new. This Slovenian and Istrian container is emblematic of changing flags and political systems forcing winemakers to make something that can’t be taken away from them. New co-fermented liters from Štajerska and Dolenjsko. Sanguine Teran, Refošk, Malvazija and Vitovska from both Istria and the Kras. The singular (and extremely limited) Batič wines from Vipavska Dolina. And finally, an iconic example of the most planted grape in Croatia. The borders move around, but the land and people often don’t. In 1993, Željko Adžić scored for the Croatian National soccer team and helped defeat Ukraine 3-1 — hero status in Croatia! In 1998, he left soccer to follow his larger passion for making wine in Kutjevo (interior Croatia), working with his father Antun full time. Slightly prior to 1993, Cistercian monks founded a winery in Kutjevo in 1232. It still stands and produces Graševina (Grash-eh-veena), the most planted grape in Croatia. The Adžić family continues this tradition. Graševina is high in acidity, has great weight, and carries both residual sugar and botrytis well. In Kutjevo, where … Continue reading Border(less) Regions are Great for Wine

#WineWednesday Spotlight #140: Shavnabada Rkatsiteli

Just a few weeks ago, the Blue Danube Wine Co. team was happy to visit the beautifully preserved Shavnabada Monastery and taste its traditionally made wines with winemaker Giorgi Abramashvili. Shavnabada Monastery is a medieval Georgian Orthodox monastery on top of a mountain of the same name. Located 15 miles south of Tbilisi, it was built in honor of St. George who, according to legend, wore a black cloak (shavi nabadi in Georgian) when leading the armies of the King of Georgia. The monastery has also been renowned for its wines made by the Monks and aged in traditional qvevris. Today, Giorgi Abramashvili is in charge of the winemaking with the help of the Monks. The monastery owns vineyards in the Kakheti wine region in Eastern Georgia that are organically farmed under the supervision of the Monks. It also uses grapes from nearby vineyards owned by friends. After the harvest, the grapes are foot trodden in the “Satsnakheli”, a traditional wooden press, and then poured into qvevris where they macerate with their skins. In the monastery’s marani (cellar), the wines can age in qvevri for many years, sometimes up to twelve years like the 2003 Rkatsiteli. The monastery has its … Continue reading #WineWednesday Spotlight #140: Shavnabada Rkatsiteli