#WineWednesday Spotlight #145: Miloš Rosé

Not so long ago, very few Americans knew about Croatia. Now, with Croatia’s outstanding accomplishment at the World Cup, everybody is talking about the smallest country to compete in a World Cup final since 1950. Plus if you like friendly people, crystal-clear waters, secluded beaches, ancient architecture, and great food and wine, Croatia has really plenty to offer. Even if you haven’t booked your flight ticket yet, here’s why you should try Croatian wine writes Lauren Mowery for Coravin. After a recent tasting event hosted by Exotic Wine Travel‘s Matthew Horkey and Charine Tan in New York City, she recommends six wines worth finding, including Milos Rosé: Milos is considered one of the first “cult” producers of Croatia, and Plavac Mali, one of the country’s most important red grapes used to make both rosé and robust, age-worthy dry red wines. This rosé wine is made in traditional fashion, eschewing stainless steel for open top fermenters and barrels. Flavors of sweet berry and cherry ride high on fresh acidity, followed by a touch of bitterness on the finish. Unlike many parts of the world, enjoying rosé is not new to Croatians. She also enjoyed Bibich Debit: The producer of this wine, … Continue reading #WineWednesday Spotlight #145: Miloš Rosé

That’s what I do. I drink Peneče and I know things…

Whenever I hear Pétillant-naturel, methode ancestrale, Pét-nat, or even Peneče, I don’t immediately think Loire, I think Berkeley. Back in 2011 while working harvest for Donkey and Goat Winery, this was the first year they made Lily’s Pét-nat. Leading up to this, I remember experiments of filling up beer bottles by hand with rough estimates of what would happen post crown cap (residual sugar, yeast populations etc…). Often, while doing other winery work, bottles could be heard exploding like distant artillery fire. It was during this time I really got a sense for what gross lees smell, taste and feel like. Eventually, they figured it out and I discovered how great wines like this could be as well. For Blue Danube, it was only a matter of time before the huge array of Central/Eastern European high acid grapes would eventually lend themselves to the oldest way of making sparkling wine. Štoka was the first to lead the charge with Teran and Vitovska from the Kras appellation in Slovenia. Tadej and Primož Štoka already produced a traditional method cave aged sparkling Teran. They knew Teran had the acidity and balance but had to reverse engineer a few things for a pét-nat. … Continue reading That’s what I do. I drink Peneče and I know things…

#WineWednesday Spotlight #144: Gotsa Family Wines Chinuri

“I’ve been reading the Iliad recently.” At the Paris Review, Valerie Stivers invites us to grill and drink with Homer. A central lesson of the Iliad is the terrifying fragility of the things that bring us together, and the importance of safeguarding them. In that spirit, it becomes a wonderful book to cook from, and turns out to be full of scenes of communality where the Greek troops mark events of social and religious significance with feasting and drinking wine. To eat like Achilles, she invented an Homeric grilling-and-skewering technique with a boneless leg of lamb, wrapped in pork belly. But how to find wines that tasted like the ones mentioned by Homer? In the Iliad, we learn that the wines are coming from ancient regions like Thrace, a large area in Eastern and Southeastern Europe, bounded by the Balkan Mountains to the north, the Aegean Sea to the south and the Black Sea to the east. She consulted with a couple of wine directors including Patrick Cournot of Ruffian Wine & Food in Manhattan’s East Village and found some startlingly delicious bottles that went perfectly with the grilled meat. Among them, the Gotsa Chinuri 2015: This wine from the … Continue reading #WineWednesday Spotlight #144: Gotsa Family Wines Chinuri

Pét-Nat, Charmat, Champenoise: plenty of bubbles for the Summer

Pétillant Naturel, or Pét-Nat for short, is a modern trend but its origin is not so new. Pét-Nats are made using the Méthode Ancestrale, the oldest way of making sparkling wines. It dates back to the 16th century and was invented by monks in the Limoux region in southwestern France. The wine is bottled before finishing its fermentation, allowing a second fermentation to naturally occur in the bottle using the residual sugar. The sediments are not removed and the wine is not filtered, producing a light and fizzy wine, often cloudy, due to the remaining lees and lack of filtration. Enjoy the fresh and lively Štoka Pét-Nats, White, Rosé, Red, made from the Slovenian grapes Vitovska and Teran. Méthode Champenoise produces sparkling wine by creating a second fermentation in bottle. The second fermentation is accomplished by adding a mixture of sugar and yeast to still wine. The wine is then bottled, capped, and aged on its lees for several months, which develops texture and complexity. When the wine is ready, the neck of the bottle is frozen in order to remove the sediments. The cap is removed and the frozen sediments shoot out of the pressurized bottle. In Hungary, Kreinbacher … Continue reading Pét-Nat, Charmat, Champenoise: plenty of bubbles for the Summer