#WineWednesday Spotlight #144: Gotsa Family Wines Chinuri

“I’ve been reading the Iliad recently.” At the Paris Review, Valerie Stivers invites us to grill and drink with Homer. A central lesson of the Iliad is the terrifying fragility of the things that bring us together, and the importance of safeguarding them. In that spirit, it becomes a wonderful book to cook from, and turns out to be full of scenes of communality where the Greek troops mark events of social and religious significance with feasting and drinking wine. To eat like Achilles, she invented an Homeric grilling-and-skewering technique with a boneless leg of lamb, wrapped in pork belly. But how to find wines that tasted like the ones mentioned by Homer? In the Iliad, we learn that the wines are coming from ancient regions like Thrace, a large area in Eastern and Southeastern Europe, bounded by the Balkan Mountains to the north, the Aegean Sea to the south and the Black Sea to the east. She consulted with a couple of wine directors including Patrick Cournot of Ruffian Wine & Food in Manhattan’s East Village and found some startlingly delicious bottles that went perfectly with the grilled meat. Among them, the Gotsa Chinuri 2015: This wine from the … Continue reading #WineWednesday Spotlight #144: Gotsa Family Wines Chinuri

Pét-Nat, Charmat, Champenoise: plenty of bubbles for the Summer

Pétillant Naturel, or Pét-Nat for short, is a modern trend but its origin is not so new. Pét-Nats are made using the Méthode Ancestrale, the oldest way of making sparkling wines. It dates back to the 16th century and was invented by monks in the Limoux region in southwestern France. The wine is bottled before finishing its fermentation, allowing a second fermentation to naturally occur in the bottle using the residual sugar. The sediments are not removed and the wine is not filtered, producing a light and fizzy wine, often cloudy, due to the remaining lees and lack of filtration. Enjoy the fresh and lively Štoka Pét-Nats, White, Rosé, Red, made from the Slovenian grapes Vitovska and Teran. Méthode Champenoise produces sparkling wine by creating a second fermentation in bottle. The second fermentation is accomplished by adding a mixture of sugar and yeast to still wine. The wine is then bottled, capped, and aged on its lees for several months, which develops texture and complexity. When the wine is ready, the neck of the bottle is frozen in order to remove the sediments. The cap is removed and the frozen sediments shoot out of the pressurized bottle. In Hungary, Kreinbacher … Continue reading Pét-Nat, Charmat, Champenoise: plenty of bubbles for the Summer

#WineWednesday Spotlight #143: Toreta Pošip Special AKA Lobster Wine

“It’s no surprise my love for lobster runs deep,” writes New York City winemaker and blogger Caroline Shifflett. “I even did a whole post on lobster and the wines that love it! For my birthday this year, we hosted the 3rd annual lobster feed and I had just the right wine to serve!” The Toreta Pošip Special is so lobster friendly, it has even a lobster on its label! Pošip (pronounced poe-ship) is a grape that grows predominantly in the Dalmatian region of Croatia and is indigenous to the island of Korcula. The grape is capable of reaching very high sugar levels so it’s no small feat that this bottling is full of ripe fruit flavors but remains light and crisp. Perfect to drink with anything pulled from the sea! The “special” bottling is from younger vines from the Toreta property. Frano Banicević is the young winemaker of Toreta, a winery founded by his great grandfather. Today, he farms roughly 5 hectares of Pošip in Korčula’s Smokvica area, not far from Pošip’s birthplace. His wines are incredibly well-balanced and of course absolutely seafood-friendly. Try also his Pošip Premium, a fuller wine made from older vines, and his Pošip Sur Lie, … Continue reading #WineWednesday Spotlight #143: Toreta Pošip Special AKA Lobster Wine

#WineWednesday Spotlight #142: Piquentum Sv. Vital Malvazija

Charine Tan and Dr Matthew Horkey, the duo behind Exotic Wine Travel, have just released part 4 of their 4-part series about Istria. it’s a great video that will introduce you to Istria’s gastronomic treasures, the region’s wines from Teran and Malvazija, and a few organic winemakers including Dimitri Brečević from Piquentum. “Piquentum wines are made with little or no intervention,” narrates Matthew Horkey. “They’re fermented with native yeast. We’re usually fond of the Piquentum Teran and Refosk but today we’re very impressed by his Sv. Vital Malvazija. It’s a reserve wine made from vines over 40 years of age.” Malvazija Istarska is one of the oldest Croatian grape varieties. Being grown in the Istrian peninsula since the ancient Greeks, it produces fresh and mineral white wines of floral and citrus character. But the quality of Malvazija wines greatly depends on the terroir. Characterized by medium-deep red soil, the Sv. Vital terroir is rich in bauxite and planted with 40-year-old vines that are farmed organically. The climate is Mediterranean with hot and dry summers tempered by the sea. On the label, the dots represent the level of rainfall from October of the previous year to September, month of the harvest. … Continue reading #WineWednesday Spotlight #142: Piquentum Sv. Vital Malvazija

#WineWednesday Spotlight #141: An Homage to Anthony Bourdain

In April 2012, Antony Bourdain toured Croatia’s Istria and Dalmatia regions and literally got knocked off his feet as he is treated to the finest Mediterranean cuisine and wines. “Why are the wines so good here?” asks Antony Bourdain while tasting Alen Bibić‘s red blend R6. “Is this a restaurant?” he asks later after being served a delicate scallops dish topped with goat cheese paired with BIBICh R5. “What’s going on here, really?” After the meal, he will thank Alen’s wife Vesna, a trained chef, on his knees for this impromptu meal “of epic quality accompanied by equally epic wines.” Let’s raise a glass of BIBICh wines in memory of Tony. Here is a moving homage from our friend and New York based sommelier and Wines of Croatia founder Cliff Rames: https://www.instagram.com/p/Bjx87sSBsTb/?hl=en&taken-by=cliff_rames And also from our friend wine writer and Founder – Writing Between the Vines Marcy Gordon: The sun sets on another day—let’s seize the moment while we can. Pay the debt with Debit. Pouring one for Mr. Bourdain tonight—cheers to the explorers who seek out great adventure and wine in life. I love the many expressions of Debit, an indigenous grape of Croatia. Alen Bibić knows how to … Continue reading #WineWednesday Spotlight #141: An Homage to Anthony Bourdain

#WineWednesday Spotlight #140: Shavnabada Rkatsiteli

Just a few weeks ago, the Blue Danube Wine Co. team was happy to visit the beautifully preserved Shavnabada Monastery and taste its traditionally made wines with winemaker Giorgi Abramashvili. Shavnabada Monastery is a medieval Georgian Orthodox monastery on top of a mountain of the same name. Located 15 miles south of Tbilisi, it was built in honor of St. George who, according to legend, wore a black cloak (shavi nabadi in Georgian) when leading the armies of the King of Georgia. The monastery has also been renowned for its wines made by the Monks and aged in traditional qvevris. Today, Giorgi Abramashvili is in charge of the winemaking with the help of the Monks. The monastery owns vineyards in the Kakheti wine region in Eastern Georgia that are organically farmed under the supervision of the Monks. It also uses grapes from nearby vineyards owned by friends. After the harvest, the grapes are foot trodden in the “Satsnakheli”, a traditional wooden press, and then poured into qvevris where they macerate with their skins. In the monastery’s marani (cellar), the wines can age in qvevri for many years, sometimes up to twelve years like the 2003 Rkatsiteli. The monastery has its … Continue reading #WineWednesday Spotlight #140: Shavnabada Rkatsiteli

#WineWednesday Spotlight #139: Lapati Super Ravi

Saperavi, one of Georgia’s oldest grape varieties, usually produces serious, deep-colored wines with high acidity and tannin. But two Frenchmen, Vincent Jullien et Guillaume Gouerou, have decided to transform the varietal into a fresh and fun wine Beaujolais-style. This Saperavi is called Lapati Super Ravi , a pun that means “very happy” in French. Aged in qvevri, Super Ravi is fully Georgian but with a French twist, as it is vinified using carbonic maceration like in Beaujolais. Whole clusters were fermented for 2 weeks with carbonic gas then destemmed and crushed after 2 weeks. The final juice was aged in qvevri for 6 months before being bottled. The resulting wine is lively and fruity with low tannins. Best enjoyed with friends and slightly chilled, it will make you cheerful and super ravi. Santé! Gaumarjos!

#WineWednesday Spotlight #138: Tsikhelishvili Jghia

Today we had the privilege to meet Aleksi Tsikhelishvili at his home near Telavi in Kakheti, Georgia. Learning winemaking from his mother, Aleksi started making wines when he was 10-year-old. Today, he makes wonderful organic qvevri wines from Rkatsiteli, the “White King of Kakheti” as he calls the most established white variety of Kakheti, and from the more delicate Mtsvane, the “White Queen of Kakheti”. His amber wines are deeply colored, tannic, savory, and incredibly multilayed. They can also age very well. He also makes a unique red wine from the rare Jghia grape. The varietal is the opposite of Kakheti’s “Red King”, the full-bodied Saperavi. It has a thin skin and produces a lightly colored red wine with distinctive spicy aromas. It is a lovely wine, fragrant and very well balanced. Of course, we couldn’t leave without tasting his homemade Chacha—the Georgian grappa—and making several toasts to friendship. After several hugs, we were sad to go but we promised to come back so that we could taste Aleksi’s special Georgian recipe.

#WineWednesday Spotlight #137: Monastery Tvrdoš Vranac

The Serbian Orthodox Monastery Tvrdoš is located in southeastern Herzegovina, 2.5 miles west of the old town of Trebinje and less than 20 miles from the Adriatic Sea. Dedicated to The Dominion of the Mother of God, it was built in the late 13th century above the right bank of the Trebisnica river on the foundations of a 4th century Roman church. The region’s wine­growing tradition dates back to the first hellenic colonies on the Adriatic Coast. The climate is sub­mediterranean with hot summers and mild winters. The Herzegovinian karst soil is shallow, mixed with white crushed stones. These warm and dry conditions are particularly well suited to the native grape varieties Žilavka and Vranac. Vranac was introduced to South Herzegovina during the Austro­Hungarian Empire. The name “Vranac”, which means “black horse”, highlights the grape’s dark color as well as its strength and power. When grown on the rocky grounds of Tvrdoš created by a washout of the soil from the surrounding hills, Vranac shows distinctive acids and intense fruity aromas. Aged for 24 months in old monastic oak barrels, the Monastery Tvrdoš Vranac exhibits a purple red color and savory, earthy aromas on the nose. The palate has a … Continue reading #WineWednesday Spotlight #137: Monastery Tvrdoš Vranac

#WineWednesday Spotlight #136: Miloš Stagnum

A couple of months ago, Cliff Rames, founder of Wines of Croatia and also Contributing-Editor-at-Large for The SOMM Journal, led the SommCon San Diego attendees though a Wines of Croatia presentation, pointing out the connection between Croatia and California and recalling the quest for Zinfandel’s origins: Geographically, Croatia appeared to be a plausible source and once researchers began testing, they found numerous varieties that shared Zinfandel’s genetic material—including Plavac Mali. After years of study, they traced an exact match: seven vines that were locally called Crljenak Kaštelanski (historically known as Tribidrag) in the Dalmatian region of coastal Croatia. Plavac Mali, native to the Adriatic Coast, is the offspring of Tribidrag and Dobričić. The region’s extremely dry conditions and lack of irrigation make viticulture difficult and Plavac Mali was preferred over Zinfandel. Cliff presented the Miloš Stagnum 2007 to showcase how well Plavac Mali can age despite its low acidity and higher alcohol content: Intriguing aromas of mint, clove, and mushroom. On the palate, notes of bay leaf and green figs mingle around a tannic core of light roasted coffee, mint, chocolate, and plum pudding. A fascinating wine considering its maturity. We just received the Miloš Stagnum 2008, also a very … Continue reading #WineWednesday Spotlight #136: Miloš Stagnum