#WineWednesday Spotlight #151: Maurer Kövidinka

Oszkar Maurer’s winery is located in the Subotica (or Szabadka in Hungarian) wine region in Serbia, just south of the Hungarian-Serbian border. This is where he traditionally and organically farms 6 acres planted to native grape varieties such as Szerémi zöld, Bakator, Mézes fehér, Kövidinka, and Kadarka. Many of these grapes are more than a hundred years old. The Szerémi zöld and Bakator were planted in 1909, the Kövidinka in 1925, and the oldest Kadarka was planted in 1880, which makes it the oldest Kadarka in the world. The Kövidinka grapes are sourced from a low-yielding 93-year-old vineyard, manually tended and still plowed with horses. The wine was spontaneously fermented with native yeast and made with low sulphur. Also low in alcohol (10.2%), it is light, dry, and crisp, with distinctive stony flavors, a creamy mouthfeel, and a fresh finish. It’s a lovely wine, perfect for the last warm weather nights of the season. Sip it with appetizers, a fresh salad or a cheese platter. You can get it here.

#WineWednesday Spotlight #150: doqi Rkatsiteli Qvevri

The doqi Rkatsiteli Qvevri is Editor in Chief of SevenFifty Daily Erica Duecy‘s new Georgian friend: Doqi, my new Georgian friend of the mysteriously scripted label. True, I may not be able to read the Georgian alphabet, but here’s what I know about the wine: It’s qvevri fermented and aged Rkatsiteli with bright notes of apricots and orange zest, honey and baking spices, and an appealing tea-like astringency. To make these wine, grapes are pressed and then fermented in qvevri (clay vats) with the juice, grape skins, stalks, and pips. After macerating for several months on the skins, the white wine develops its amber color. Thanks @themaritimerepublic for the intro. We just received a new shipment of doqi wines from Georgia. You should try them out, there’re delicious. And stay on top of the wine news with Erica Duecy at SevenFifty Daily.

#WineWednesday Spotlight #149: Tinon Dry Szamorodni

Christina Turley, Director of Sales and Marketing at Turley Wine Cellars is a fan of Hungarian wines, especially the amazing Tinon Dry Szamorodni: Hungarian wine does something to my soul, the way no other wine has ever even come close; and THIS. This. This is one of the wildest, tastiest, most profound, most bonkers wines I’ve ever had. White flowers, saddle leather, beeswax…I imagine this wine tastes like Lady Godiva’s infamous ride. The longest finish of any wine I’ve ever had, period. I’m floored. Dry Szamorodni is a traditional wine from Tokaj. The name is a Polish word that means as comes off the vine because the wine is made from whole clusters of grapes containing both healthy and botrytized berries that are harvested and fermented together. It is then slowly aged under a veil of yeast. At the end, the wine is dry, with powerful flavors of nuts and dried fruits and savory notes like mushroom and maybe also Lady Godiva’s infamous ride 🙂 We just received a shipment from Hungary with some wonderful new wines from Tokaj and other regions. Check them out. And follow what Christina Turley is tasting these days on Instagram.

#WineWednesday Spotlight #148: Štoka Teran

“This Killer Adriatic Red is a Must-Try,” says David Lynch, Sommelier & Editorial Director at SommSelect. And although a cynic might think the reason a sommelier had selected an obscure wine was just to show-off, nine times out of ten, the customer should really be trustful: Listen, I know: trusting is hard. But if this were a tableside interaction instead of an email offer, I have no doubt that Štoka Teran would win me your trust. Why? Because it’s a wine which, despite what some experts say, exhibits true soil character. Because it’s a wine from one of those deeply historic yet somehow still-unknown regions the most devoted wine geeks cherish (in this case, Slovenia). And finally, because it is undeniably delicious, easy to drink, and not merely distinctive but undeniably well-made. According to David Lynch, the wine can age for a few more years and right now, is best decanted for 30 minutes. Serve it in Bordeaux glasses and pair it with juicy medium-rare burgers. Read the complete tasting notes and food pairing at SommSelect.

#WineWednesday Spotlight #147: Demeter Zoltán Late Harvest Eszter

Over at Wine Berserkers, wine lover Robert Pavlovich writes about his trip to Tokaj and his winery visits to Demeter, Majoros, and Bott. His first visit was with Demeter Zoltán: It was an honor to get a visit here as the property is immaculate, with great respect for the past and an eye toward the future. It’s rather small but maximizes its space expertly, and gives the impression that the pursuit of quality here is second to none. The 2013 Late Harvest Eszter—named after Zoltán’s daughter—was so good, it was the bottle he took home: Apricot, dates, honey aromatics are very pleasing and accessible. Effortless on the palate as well, it delivers brilliant sweetness with good complexity of fruit and acidity. Perhaps not quite as thought provoking or complex as good Aszu, which is partly due to being raised in stainless steel, and selection. However, this is just a brilliant effort and the one we took home with us. Read the rest of the visit and Robert’s tasting notes at wineberserkers.com Our next shipment from Hungary containing the 2013 vintage of Zoltán’s Late Harvest Eszter arrives in California in a few days. Stay tuned!

#WineWednesday Spotlight #146: Brkić Greda

Wine blogger Nancy Brazil over at Pull That Cork loves to try new things and recently discovered the 2015 Brkić Greda Žilavka, a wine from a grape variety and a wine region she was not familiar with: This wine caught our attention immediately with its deep golden color and unfamiliar, complex aromas and flavors. It made me think, in a way, of aged Chardonnay. But different. We discussed this wine for quite some time after first tasting it. By luck, she found the perfect pairing for the wine, a new mushroom pasta recipe from Wine Enthusiast Magazine: The mushroom, umami flavors and brown butter were a perfect match for similar flavors in the wine. We had no idea what this wine would taste like, so it was just dumb luck that this pairing worked so well. I had to laugh when, as I sat down to write this cellar note, I read the importer’s food suggestion: brown butter mushrooms or soy sauce. Read the whole blog post here. Using biodynamic practices, Josip Brkić makes magical wines using the native, enduring Žilavka (“zilav” means “tough” in slavic languages). That’s a grape that has adapted to the scorched rocky soils of the … Continue reading #WineWednesday Spotlight #146: Brkić Greda

#WineWednesday Spotlight #145: Miloš Rosé

Not so long ago, very few Americans knew about Croatia. Now, with Croatia’s outstanding accomplishment at the World Cup, everybody is talking about the smallest country to compete in a World Cup final since 1950. Plus if you like friendly people, crystal-clear waters, secluded beaches, ancient architecture, and great food and wine, Croatia has really plenty to offer. Even if you haven’t booked your flight ticket yet, here’s why you should try Croatian wine writes Lauren Mowery for Coravin. After a recent tasting event hosted by Exotic Wine Travel‘s Matthew Horkey and Charine Tan in New York City, she recommends six wines worth finding, including Milos Rosé: Milos is considered one of the first “cult” producers of Croatia, and Plavac Mali, one of the country’s most important red grapes used to make both rosé and robust, age-worthy dry red wines. This rosé wine is made in traditional fashion, eschewing stainless steel for open top fermenters and barrels. Flavors of sweet berry and cherry ride high on fresh acidity, followed by a touch of bitterness on the finish. Unlike many parts of the world, enjoying rosé is not new to Croatians. She also enjoyed Bibich Debit: The producer of this wine, … Continue reading #WineWednesday Spotlight #145: Miloš Rosé

#WineWednesday Spotlight #144: Gotsa Family Wines Chinuri

“I’ve been reading the Iliad recently.” At the Paris Review, Valerie Stivers invites us to grill and drink with Homer. A central lesson of the Iliad is the terrifying fragility of the things that bring us together, and the importance of safeguarding them. In that spirit, it becomes a wonderful book to cook from, and turns out to be full of scenes of communality where the Greek troops mark events of social and religious significance with feasting and drinking wine. To eat like Achilles, she invented an Homeric grilling-and-skewering technique with a boneless leg of lamb, wrapped in pork belly. But how to find wines that tasted like the ones mentioned by Homer? In the Iliad, we learn that the wines are coming from ancient regions like Thrace, a large area in Eastern and Southeastern Europe, bounded by the Balkan Mountains to the north, the Aegean Sea to the south and the Black Sea to the east. She consulted with a couple of wine directors including Patrick Cournot of Ruffian Wine & Food in Manhattan’s East Village and found some startlingly delicious bottles that went perfectly with the grilled meat. Among them, the Gotsa Chinuri 2015: This wine from the … Continue reading #WineWednesday Spotlight #144: Gotsa Family Wines Chinuri

Pét-Nat, Charmat, Champenoise: plenty of bubbles for the Summer

Pétillant Naturel, or Pét-Nat for short, is a modern trend but its origin is not so new. Pét-Nats are made using the Méthode Ancestrale, the oldest way of making sparkling wines. It dates back to the 16th century and was invented by monks in the Limoux region in southwestern France. The wine is bottled before finishing its fermentation, allowing a second fermentation to naturally occur in the bottle using the residual sugar. The sediments are not removed and the wine is not filtered, producing a light and fizzy wine, often cloudy, due to the remaining lees and lack of filtration. Enjoy the fresh and lively Štoka Pét-Nats, White, Rosé, Red, made from the Slovenian grapes Vitovska and Teran. Méthode Champenoise produces sparkling wine by creating a second fermentation in bottle. The second fermentation is accomplished by adding a mixture of sugar and yeast to still wine. The wine is then bottled, capped, and aged on its lees for several months, which develops texture and complexity. When the wine is ready, the neck of the bottle is frozen in order to remove the sediments. The cap is removed and the frozen sediments shoot out of the pressurized bottle. In Hungary, Kreinbacher … Continue reading Pét-Nat, Charmat, Champenoise: plenty of bubbles for the Summer

#WineWednesday Spotlight #143: Toreta Pošip Special AKA Lobster Wine

“It’s no surprise my love for lobster runs deep,” writes New York City winemaker and blogger Caroline Shifflett. “I even did a whole post on lobster and the wines that love it! For my birthday this year, we hosted the 3rd annual lobster feed and I had just the right wine to serve!” The Toreta Pošip Special is so lobster friendly, it has even a lobster on its label! Pošip (pronounced poe-ship) is a grape that grows predominantly in the Dalmatian region of Croatia and is indigenous to the island of Korcula. The grape is capable of reaching very high sugar levels so it’s no small feat that this bottling is full of ripe fruit flavors but remains light and crisp. Perfect to drink with anything pulled from the sea! The “special” bottling is from younger vines from the Toreta property. Frano Banicević is the young winemaker of Toreta, a winery founded by his great grandfather. Today, he farms roughly 5 hectares of Pošip in Korčula’s Smokvica area, not far from Pošip’s birthplace. His wines are incredibly well-balanced and of course absolutely seafood-friendly. Try also his Pošip Premium, a fuller wine made from older vines, and his Pošip Sur Lie, … Continue reading #WineWednesday Spotlight #143: Toreta Pošip Special AKA Lobster Wine