Exploring the Dalmatian Coast and Suha Punta Wines with Marion & Zdravko Podolski

Our friends Marion and Zdravko divide there time between California and Croatia, sharing their experiences through the blog “Go Hvar – Ramblings About a Far Island“. Recently they visited the Dalmatian coast, stopping to tour and taste at Suha Punta winery. Marion and Zdravko have graciously allowed us to share their piece with you. Živjeli (cheers)! Exploring the Dalmatian coast – Primošten, Suha Punta wines and the vineyards of Bucavac Our normal mode of driving north from Hvar is to take the inland motorway. It’s fast and easy, and we’re usually on our way to Zagreb with no time for scenic diversions. But this May we treated ourselves to a more relaxed trip up the magistrala, that wonderfully scenic Croatian coastal road. Setting out from Hvar on a rainy Saturday morning, the clouds gradually cleared as we drove past Trogir, with the road pretty much to ourselves. Coming up towards Primošten, we spotted a large boatyard backed by a spectacular pattern of drystone walls. This was Bucavac, known for good reason as “stone lace“, and looking just like an Oton Gliha painting. (Note: Bucavac is pronounced “Boots-a-vats” as in Croatian “c” is actually “ts”.) These are not terraced vineyards, as … Continue reading Exploring the Dalmatian Coast and Suha Punta Wines with Marion & Zdravko Podolski

Crljenak Kaštelanski — Discovering Zinfandel’s Croatian Roots

The Mrčevlje vineyard above the village of Cavtat where the Dubrovački Crljenak Kaštelanski grows. It is a very exciting time to be a student of wine. DNA fingerprinting has led to many new discoveries about grape varietals, in particular identifying genetic relationships. One such discovery was made in 2001 by University of Davis professor, Carole Meredith. After hearing suggestions that Zinfandel may be related to a Croatian grape, Meredith went to Croatia to collect samples. What she found is that Zinfandel is actually an indigenous Croatian varietal referred to locally as Crljenak Kaštelanski. Other than California, the grape is cultivated extensively in Italy, going by the name Primitivo. Read the full story of how the Original Zinfandel was found in Croatia: here. It has been a long time since we have had a Crljenak Kaštelanski (CK for short) also known as Tribidrag in our portfolio. Many of you sent requests and inquiries so we are pleased to introduce the 2012 Dubrovački Podrumi Crljenak (Zinfandel). Dubrovački Podrumi was founded in 1877 by Kolić Pero, a wine merchant. After World War II, the winery became a state-run operation. In 2000, the winery was bought by local entrepreneurs who revitalized the winemaking program … Continue reading Crljenak Kaštelanski — Discovering Zinfandel’s Croatian Roots

Dalmatian Island Wine: The Carić Winery

Our friends Andrew Villone, of Savor the Experience Tours, and Wine Awesomeness teamed up to present this informative interview with Ivana Carić herself about why you need to visit Hvar and her winery. Particularly interesting are her local food and wine pairing suggestions. We, the Carić family, love salted anchovies served with raštika (collard). We pair this with our white wine Bogdanjuša. Collard is a very old type of cabbage, eaten in the Roman times. Today, it’s hard to find this form of cabbage in the market or in stores, but every house on the island has it in its garden. Read the whole article here. Browse Carić wines here.

Austria’s Wine Future Looks Brightest in Burgenland

  Award-winning author John Mariani shares his view on Austria’s wine future in this article for the Huffington Post. Not only does he find the wines from Burgenland to be the most exciting, he is also enamored by one of the producers we work with in the region, Juris. I was, however, most impressed by the Austrian red wines I tasted, for I’d never had much interest in them before and very little at all with those from Burgenland. I had a splendid wine named Juris (George) from Gols, made from the often finicky St. Laurent grape, related to Pinot Noir, but with more body and concentration. Continue reading the article and then browse Juris wines.

Emerging Wine Regions: Georgia

  With one of the oldest wine making traditions in the world, Georgia is believed by many to be the birthplace of wine making. DNA evidence has shown that wine was made in the region at least 7,000 years ago! The Middle Ages was a golden period for winemaking in Georgia. As in Burgundy, local monks and farmers studied the terroir and plant the best grapes in the best areas. Read the rest of the article by Bottlenotes to find out why Georgian wines are “on the tip of every hip somm’s tongue”. Try the recommended Pheasant’s Tears wines.

Wine Portraits: Gogi Dakishvili of Schuchmann Wines Georgia

If you have tasted more than a few Georgian wines, chances are at least one of them was made under the watchful eyes of Gogi Dakishvili. He has made wine for one of the largest Georgian producers, Teliani Valley, and one of the smallest, Vinoterra, which is now part of the Schuchmann Wines Georgia family. He has been working as a chief wine-maker in “Schuchmann Wines Georgia” since its establishment in 2008 where he carefully and cautiously put his great experience accumulated from travel and knowledge gained from approaching world wine traditions into practice. Read more of Keto Ninidze’ written “portrait” here. Browse all our Georgian wines, including those made by Gogi here.

Hungarian Wine Tasting Review by Christine Havens

Recently Frank Dietrich led an in depth tasting of Hungarian wines at Soif wine bar in Santa Cruz, CA. The wines represented many of the major appellations and indigenous grapes of the regions. Wine writer Christine Havens attended this event and has graciously permitted us to share her blog post, in which she provides detailed notes of the wines tasted as well as a little of her own connection to Hungary. You can view the original post, and all of Christine’s other reviews on her site. Hungarian Wine Tasting at Soif Wine Bar & Merchants by Christine Havens. My mother is Hungarian. My father was mostly English with some other nationalities thrown in, like most Americans, his family tree included a pinch of German and a nip of Irish. My dad never talked about his heritage, but my mother has always been fiercely proud of her ancestry. I suppose that’s why I’ve always identified as Hungarian, the country with some of the world’s most beautiful women and a famously high rate of depression, pessimism and overall gloominess. After my grandparents had passed, photos of my great grandparents emerged from dusty albums stored and long forgotten in their basement. My predecessors … Continue reading Hungarian Wine Tasting Review by Christine Havens

Revenge of the Wine Spritzer

While you may not be able to recall the last time you encountered a wine spritzer, the beverage is quite popular in many countries. In fact throughout most of Eastern Europe you will find that adding a touch of sparkling water to wine is just as common as drinking wine on its own. Why? First off, wine plays a different role in Eastern European cultures than it does in the West. On this difference Stetson Robbins of Blue Danube Wines says “they view wine as less precious. It’s just part of the table, like bread. I think in Central and Eastern Europe this quality is even stronger.” Well, there you have it. Read the rest of this article by Wine Awesomeness here. In Slovenia, a popular wine for a spritzer is Črnko Jareninčan which will be back in stock soon. Or try the article’s suggestion and add a little spritz to Georgian Saperavi. This fresh style by Schuchmann will do the trick.

It’s Time To Give Rosé The Respect It Deserves

Rosé is no longer a sweet, uninspiring wine to drink as was often the case in past generations. More and more people are discovering the diversity of rosé and the wine is enjoying renewed popularity. A younger generation of vinophiles are increasingly embracing the pink stuff, and more and more winemakers are producing rosé to keep up with its rising popularity. According to Nielsen, rosé sales in the US grew 25.4 percent last year. Continue reading this article by Lauren Gitlin for the NY Post, where our Štoka Teran rosé is recommended as one to “drink now”. Vine Wine owner Talitha Whidbee says,”It’s refreshing and delicious but it has enough weight and structure to hold up to some winter foods. I took it home and had it with chicken and tomatoes baked with feta.”

Hungary’s Divine Tokaj Wines

Do you want to know more about Hungary’s beloved wine region of Tokaj? welovebudapest.com has put together this great primer on the region and its myriad of wine styles. Like a gigantic quilt of randomly shaped corduroy patches draped over a vast expanse of pillows, the hills of Hungary’s globally revered Tokaj wine region are crisscrossed with premier vineyards cultivated for centuries – this is the source of goldenly sweet Aszú, long esteemed as one of the world’s most desirable libations. Read the whole article here. Drink wines from the article: Try the masterful dry Furmints from Demeter Zoltán or the often overlooked specialty dry Szamorodni, from Samuel Tinon. View all of our wines from Hungary here.