#WineWednesday Spotlight #29: Gere Cabernet Sauvignon

Contributed by Michael Zeebroek. Michael is a young Belgian living in Budapest. He writes a wine blog called Wonderfultasting where his “goal is to get the world to respect Hungarian wines…” Gere Atilla Cabernet Sauvignon 2012 Gere Atilla is one of the most famous wine makers in Hungary, he put Hungary on the wine map with his famous Kopár cuvée. The winery is run by the Gere family and cellar tours will only be given by one of the members. The winery itself is located just a small walk out of the town centre where they also have a spa hotel named Crocus and a fine dining restaurant named Mandula. The restaurant is where you will most likely enjoy a wine tasting so you can also enjoy a few dishes that will perfectly complement the wine.   The history of Gere Pincészete started seven generations ago, the ancestors of Atilla Gere took a long journey which was challenging and required great diligence. The family always wanted to respect and follow the traditions but at the same time there had to be room for experimenting and trying to make new and interesting wines. Today the Gere cellar has over 70 hectares … Continue reading #WineWednesday Spotlight #29: Gere Cabernet Sauvignon

Happy 52nd Anniversary to the Dingač Appellation

Originally published by Marija Mrgudić on Facebook. Republished here with permission. Marija Mrgudić is a distinguished wine maker in Orebić on the Pelješac peninsula in Croatia. The Bura-Mrgudić family winery makes internationally renowned wines in the premier cru vineyards Dingač and Postup. English translation courtesy of Zdravko Podolski. 52 Years of the Dingač Brand Fifty two years ago, on May 13th 1964, the name ‘Dingač’ was first registered. The Dingač Cooperative in Potomje on the Pelješac peninsula, received its certificate from the International Bureaux for the Protection of Industrial, Literary, and Artistic Property (Bureaux Internationaux reunis pour la protection da la propriete industrielle, litteraire et artistique Geneve – now subsumed into the World International Property Organisation). Dingač thus became the very first internationally protected wine from the former Yugoslavia. It was protected and listed as top quality wine, based on a study for the determination of properties of top quality red wines  from the Dingač area. The study was prepared by experts from the Split Institute for Adriatic Culture, according to the Geneva Convention on Intellectual Property. The whole process was started by the renowned Marcel Jelaska, and it was the first such effort by the Institute. 1961 was the … Continue reading Happy 52nd Anniversary to the Dingač Appellation

Explore Croatia with Secret Dalmatia

Written by Alan Mandić, founder Secret Dalmatia. As the founder and managing director, Alan is personally dedicated to the vision of bringing the hidden beauties of Croatia to every client. Alan has a deep connection to his country, so after finishing his university education at the New England School of Arts & Design in Boston, he decided to return to Croatia. The decision to found Secret Dalmatia followed an epiphany he had whilst wandering around Bribirska Glavica, one of the most important archaeological sites in the country. As the sunset settled in the distance, he stumbled upon two open sarcophagi and thought: “I must show this to the world!” Few months later, in 2005, he put together his passion, experience, and knowledge to create Secret Dalmatia and he has been dedicated to it full-time ever since. Savoring the lingering taste of Istrian truffles, Pag cheese and Ston oysters, bedazzled by the Adriatic’s virgin olive oils and world-class wines, Anthony Bourdain declared Croatia ‘the next big thing’. Travel Channel’s Andy Zimmerman followed with his Bizarre Foods. Traveling further back in time, he sought out authentic old specialties still simmering in spite of modern times, tasting, among others, dormice (dormouse special) on … Continue reading Explore Croatia with Secret Dalmatia

Drink Your Way Through Austrian Wine

This guide by Wine Folly makes it easy to learn more about Austria’s key wine grapes and styles: Grüner Veltliner, Zweigelt, Blaufränkisch, Saint Laurent, Riesling, Gemischter Satz, and Sekt. Austrian wines are mostly made in the eastern side of the country (where the major population areas are) and the cooler continental climate produces racy, dry white wines and elegant, fruity reds. This is not a region for rich, opulent wines like what you’ll find in much of California and Australia. Instead, Austrian wines lean towards tart, herbaceous flavors in a style more akin to France. So, if you’re a Francophile when it comes to wine preference, Austrian wine has that certain je ne sais quoi. Shop Austrian wines

The vineyard must be full of rock’n’roll: a conversation with Miha Batič

Batič wines have an immediate signature despite often drastic vintage variation. The tone and substance of Miha Batič is also immediately recognizable in his words. Having been fortunate enough to visit him, walk the vineyards and drink in concert with his vinyl collection, I’ve also hosted him a number of times in the Bay Area. I can assure you from first hand experiences, that if you’re into wine as philosophy, magic, poetry and yet still being effortless to easily finish a whole bottle, this interview is worth a gander. Let’s listen to Miha in is own words and look forward to drinking his 2015 Rosé, 2013 Pinela and 2013 Zaria — Eric Danch Miha, what’s a biodynamic wine? Biodynamic is a method of farming that goes beyond organic, considering the laws of the Earth’s natural motion and the seasons. A biodynamic wine reflects the variety and terroir in most living beings. Wine, like all living things, changes a little every day depending on factors like the phases of the moon and your company. When you drink in good company, the wine can taste even sweeter! What changes were made to attain Demeter certification? In the middle of the eighties we … Continue reading The vineyard must be full of rock’n’roll: a conversation with Miha Batič

#WineWednesday Spotlight #28: Coronica Crno Red Blend

Written by Tara Q. Thomas for Wine & Spirits Magazine. Republished here with her permission. Tara has been a wine writer for about 15 years, mainly at Wine & Spirits, where she is the Executive Editor and the wine critic for wines of Austria, Germany, Hungary, Eastern Europe and the Mediterranean. 2014 Coronica Crno (Best Buy)- 90 points Bright and tangy, this blend of teran with 10 percent each merlot and cabernet sauvignon impresses with all the details carried on its juicy fruit-the rose scents and hibiscus tea flavors, the spices like star anise and cloves. It’s fresh and thirst quenching, ready for cookouts this summer. Our Notes: Faced with variable and cool conditions throughout the summer of 2014, Istrian Teran master Moreno Coronica opted to make a lighter, less extracted red cuvee using declassified premium Teran, Merlot and Cabernet Sauvignon. Whatever role the international varieties play, it is the Teran and the Terra Rossa soil that dominate the character of the wine. It is bright and spicy with notes of myrtle, thyme, orange, clove and the region’s characteristic briny iron note. A great wine to enjoy on its own or with pizza; it’s comfort wine for comfort food!

#WineWednesday Spotlight #27: Kindzmarauli Marani Kakhetian Royal

Video review contributed by James Melendez aka James the Wine Guy. James is a San Francisco based wine vlogger “Demystifying Wine…One Bottle at a Time. Passionate about wine, food, travel, science & technology.” Subscribe to his YouTube channel and never miss a review! 2013 Kindzmarauli Marani Kakhetian Royal Kakhetian Royal is a unique Appellation Controlled dry white made from a blend of three Georgian grape varieties – Mtsvane Kakhuri, Rkatsiteli and Khikhvi, all cultivated in the Kvareli region in Kakheti. Beautiful wine. I’m a huge fan of the Republic of Georgia wines. I think they are doing an amazing job; what a lineage. It’s a wine that I would start off with food, maybe charcuterie and cheese. James characterizes the aromas and flavor with descriptors such as “orange zest, beeswax, apricot, and exotic honey”. Watch the whole video now and be inspired to try a bottle! Learn more about Kindzmarauli Marani here. Learn more about the wines of Georgia here.

#WineWednesday Spotlight #26: Brkić Žilavka

Contributed by Michael W. Trainor aka @awordtothewine on Instagram and Twitter. Michael is a “high energy guitar playing glorified wino with an intense curiosity and passion for all living things” based in Los Angeles. Be sure to follow him! I must confess. I’m having a love affair with Blue Danube Wine. I’m starting to believe they import wine specifically for my pleasure. This was indeed my first date with a wine from Bosnia Herzegovina. The 2014 Brkić Čitlučka Žilavka is a beautiful and unique white wine. The grape is Žilavka, simply pronounced (zhee-lav-ka). So much charm, so much heart, so much beauty, unique characteristics, and so many layers of flavors. A wine made with love and harmony. Organic farming, spontaneous fermentation, aged on its lees, and bottled unfiltered. Perfect. Maybe this should be the only way wines are made. Learn more about the Brkić winery here.

How to Get In On the Georgian Wine Revival

Even though Georgia’s winemaking tradition dates back 8,000 years, Georgian wines have only recently become more available in the United States. Carson Demmond suggests you pay attention to these wines in a recent article for Food & Wine. Ten years ago, Georgian wine might have earned a casual mention in conversations about Eastern European cuisine. Now, thanks to a handful of importers and well-traveled sommeliers, it’s at the forefront. Not only is Georgia home to one of the most generous of hospitality traditions – a wine-centric feast known as the supra – it also boasts a winemaking history that goes back a whopping 8,000 years. As early as the Bronze Age there, grape juice was being fermented in beeswax-lined clay vessels called qvevri buried in the ground, and fascinatingly, that’s still how much of the country’s wine is being made today. One suggested wine to try is 2013 Kindzmarauli Marani Saperavi: Kindzmarauli is both the name of a semi-sweet red made from the Saperavi grape and the name of one of the most important wineries in the Kakheti region, so make sure to look for the word ‘dry’ on the label. This is rich in color, velvety in texture, with … Continue reading How to Get In On the Georgian Wine Revival

#WineWednesday Spotlight #24: Rosenhof Blaufränkisch Eiswein

Contributed by Matthew Gaughan: wine blogger and educator based in Napa, CA. See Matthew’s blog Matthew’s World of Wine & Drink. This is part two of a spotlight on Rosenhof eisweins. See the first post here. Rosenhof Blaufränkisch Eiswein 2012 Last week I wrote about an Eiswein made from Austria’s signature grape variety, Grüner Veltliner. Even more unusually, this week I focus on another of Austria’s quality varieties: Blaufränkisch, the landlocked country’s second-most planted black grape. Eiswein from a black grape is not unheard of – I’ve tasted Eisweins made from Malbec in Argentina and Cabernet Franc in Canada – but it is uncommon. Red wines produced from Blaufränkisch, called Lemberger in Germany and Washington, can come in a range of styles, from light and Pinot-esque to oaky, more concentrated, and Syrah-like. Whatever the style, the wine should be marked by high acidity, a bright colour, firm tannins, and red fruits. Like the Grüner Veltliner last week, I was curious to see how varietally specific the Eiswein would be. The Rosenhof winery is run by a father and son team, Vinzenz and Reinhard Haider, whose family have been making wine since 1947. Despite that history, the Haiders – as with many other … Continue reading #WineWednesday Spotlight #24: Rosenhof Blaufränkisch Eiswein