Introducing Our New Producer Tornai

In 1945, Endre Tornai, the only survivor of his family, walked home to Hungary from the Russian front. Linka, a girl he fancied from before the war waited for him and they got married at Christmas of the same year. They bought a one acre vineyard on the Somló hill, and in 1946 they had both their first child and their first harvest. Anna, one of his grandchildren says “my grandfather was in love with the Somló, and so is my father”. This love made the Tornai family endure, and led them to dedicate their life to the Somló. After communism ended in ’89, they could buy back their old lands and now are farming 70 acres. They are open to innovation while working with the traditional grapes of the Somló: Juhfark, Furmint, Olaszrizling, Hárslevelű. The Somló is the smallest appellation of Hungary – basically one basalt hill popping up from a flat landscape. It’s one of the most expressive terroirs in the world, a truly magical place. We are excited to have another producer from this tiny yet powerful region. The Tornai Juhfark and Furmint will be available later this month!

#WineWednesday Spotlight #25: Wetzer Kékfrankos

The town of Sopron, right near the western border of Hungary is where some of the best Kékfrankos (in Austria this grape is known as Blaufränkisch) comes from. Having strong cultural and viticultural ties to Burgenland as well, it makes sense that Kékfrankos is the most planted variety here. Sopron is unique to Hungary in its climate as well it’s traditions of vinification. Instead of being in or near the vineyards, cellars are located under the houses of the families making the wine. It is this rich historical environment where Peter Wetzer comes from; his house and cellar belonged to his family for five generations. Wetzer is striving to make wines that follow old traditions and are related to the appellation of Sopron in the closest sense possible: keeping natural flora in the vineyard, no tilling or trimming is practiced. The wine is fermented with native yeast, unfined and unfiltered. He does everything in the vineyard by hand. This traditional approach combined with the sub-alpine climate of cooler summers and milder winters results in a wine which is rugged and elegant at the same time. The darker fruit associated with Kékfrankos is accompanied by some tartness and acidity, it is a … Continue reading #WineWednesday Spotlight #25: Wetzer Kékfrankos

#WineWednesday Spotlight #12: Tinon Dry Szamorodni

Bordeaux vigneron Samuel Tinon, settled in Tokaj with his family after making wine all over the world. His wife, Mathilde, a wine journalist, tells their extraordinary story in a matter-of-fact way, but even her words are soaked with the beauty of Tokaj. “Wherever we were in the world, we always just thought about Tokaj, coming back here. The botrytis is perfect here, and we were fascinated by the aszú. We were on a quest, to discover the aszú berry”. In fact, “aszú”, the Hungarian word for the noble rot, botrytis, does enjoy the climate of Tokaj. Nights of thick fog are followed by warm sunshine in the fall, allowing the healthy development of botrytis. Today’s wine is dry Szamorodni. Partially botrytized bunches are picked as a whole (versus berry-selecting for an aszú wine) and fermented, resulting in Tokaji Szamorodni. Being really popular in Poland, the name “szamorodni” comes from the Polish word “as it is”, or “as it grows”. What makes this particular Szamorodni so unique and wonderful, is that Tinon went back to the original, traditional way of making this wine: aging it in partial barrels and allowing flor, the surface yeast to develop. The result is extreme complexity: … Continue reading #WineWednesday Spotlight #12: Tinon Dry Szamorodni