#WineWednesday Spotlight #93: Miloš Plavac

Our new Dalmatian container is coming soon with brand new vintages from the Miloš winery! The Miloš family has been making full bodied Plavac from the rugged coastal vineyards of Pelješac Peninsula in for over 500 years. Today, the wines are certified organic, made with minimal intervention and totally aged worthy. Wine lover and blogger Nenad Trifunović just reviewed the Miloš Plavac 2013 on his blog Dnevnik Vinopije (Diary of the Wine-Drinker): I still feel the playful fruit, the smell of ripe grapes harvested in the vineyard. I can see the bees and wasps sticking in the air filled with smells. While in the glass, the wine gradually releases figs and roasted almonds aromas. On the palate, the wine is well balanced. Clearly, the tannins are present, rubbing the palate but also associated with beautiful fresh balsamic notes. Ready to enjoy and ready for storage. Try the new Miloš wines on our webshop

Mon Chérry…

Forced French puns aside, in the 11th hour brainstorming that usually precedes a newsletter to the trade, it occurred to me — cherries! Marasca cherries, which grow up and down the Dalmatian coast (including Slovenia and Southern Hungary) became famous all over Europe once distilled into Maraschino. Most of this production eventually moved to Italy after the destruction of WWII, but famous producers like Luxardo (1821) were all founded in Croatia. Cherry festivals can also be found all over Croatia and neighboring Slovenia. Whether you’re in Istria/Slovene Istria (Piquentum, Coronica, Santomas), Goriška Brda (Kabaj), the Kras (Štoka), Dolenjska (Martinčič) or Štajerska (Črnko), cherries abound. Sour, bitter and sweet, they also play a role in the cuisine as fresh soups, desserts, added to stews, jams, syrups, etc… Granted, I know I’m not breaking new ground by attaching cherry flavors to wine. It’s less about the wines tasting like cherries (although some really do), but a similar balance between bitter, sweet and sour. Whether it’s skin contact Ravan (Friulano), Rebula (Ribolla Gialla) and Sivi Pinot (Pinot Grigio), salty barrel aged Malvasia Istriana, bloody Teran, sweet and sour Cviček, bright and aromatic white field blends, or tart Refošk, there’s a kinship at play. … Continue reading Mon Chérry…

#WineWednesday Spotlight #82: Coronica Malvasia

As a follow-up to my previous post Istria, the new Tuscany, let’s enjoy a glass of Coronica Malvasia 2015. Moreno Coronica farms 75 acres of “Terra Rossa” vineyards just outside the Istrian port town of Umag, 30 miles south of Trieste, Italy. His production is roughly 75% Malvasia, 25% Teran. He vinifies his Malvasia in stainless steel with cultured yeast at controlled temperature, followed by extensive time on the lees. While the wine is fresh and mineral, the lees provides a lovely mid-palate texture and then on the finish, there’s some saltiness reminiscent of the nearby sea. As the days are now getting longer and warmer, enjoy it with some tapas on a sunny evening.

Istria, the new Tuscany

Olive tree groves, vineyard-dotted hills, truffles and medieval hilltop towns: we’re not describing Tuscany but Istria, a heart-shaped peninsula — the largest in the Adriatic Sea — located south of Trieste. Long ruled by the Venetians and later the Hapsburgs, it is now shared by three countries: the largest part (89%) is in Croatia, the northwestern part lies in Slovenia, and a very tiny portion belongs to Italy. While they both enjoy a rich food and wine culture and a beneficial Mediterranean climate, Tuscany and Istria are not completely similar: more than 80% of Tuscany’s production is in red wine while about 80% of the wine produced in Istria is white. Its most significant grape variety is Malvasia Istriana (also the second most important Croatian white grape after Graševina). This ancient grape is believed to have been introduced by the Venetians from Greece. Young Malvasia, simply vinified in stainless steel, produces fresh and crisp delicious wines, ideal partners for grilled sea bass, squid, sardines, and langoustines from the Adriatic. On the other hand, barrel aging and a few days of skin contact can produce a more full-bodied and age-worthy style, perfect accompaniment to Istrian pasta with truffle, black risotto, and … Continue reading Istria, the new Tuscany

#WineWednesday Spotlight #80: Toreta Pošip Premium

How come? Frano Banicević’s Pošip Premium is once again a #WineWednesday Spotlight! Two reasons for this: first of all, the wine is really delicious, and secondly, Marcy’s springtime Instagram collage is absolutely gorgeous! Sipping some Toreta Pošip will always bring back sweet memories of our visit almost a year ago to Korčula: Like Spring itself, it’s fresh and bright with pineapple and quince notes, a touch of chalk, and great gobs of acidity. I met the Baničevic family last April on my wine scouting trip to Croatia with Blue Danube Wine. They showed us the Pošip memorial where the first vines were planted, then we joined the entire family for a seaside repast that paired perfectly with more Pošip. What a memorable day it was! Looking for a taste springtime to ward off the Winter Blues? –This is it. Toreta, try it you’ll like it! #wine #croatia #winesofcroatia #pošip #posip #korcula #toreta #bluedanubewine #roadtripmemories Follow Marcy Gordon on Instagram here.

Meet our Women Vintners

Do you know that as many as 13 of the wineries in our current portfolio are run or co-run by women? Witnessing an increasing number of talented women involved in the wine industry on International Women’s Day is exciting. They may have taken different paths — some took over their family estate from their parents, others founded their wineries from scratch — but they are all passionate about their work. Whether they have a degree in oenology or learned the trade while working with their family, these women are making important contributions to viticulture and winemaking. In Austria, grower and winemaker Ilse Maier pioneered organic farming in Kremstal when she took over Geyerhof, the family estate, in 1986. Dorli Muhr resuscitated her family vineyards in Carnuntum and now produces some of Austria’s finest Blaufränkisch. In Tokaj, Hungary, winemakers Judit Bodó and Stéphanie Berecz founded respectively Bott and Kikelet wineries with their husbands and are now making some of the best wines of the region. In 2014, Stéphanie was awarded by her fellow winemakers the prestigious title of “winemaker of the winemakers”. Sarolta Bárdos who owns and runs Tokaj Nobilis was the winner of the prestigious award of 2012 Winemaker of … Continue reading Meet our Women Vintners

“I am Tribidrag” Conference

Jancis Robinson’s logic in deciding that Tribidrag should be the prime name of the grape variety that also appears in almost identical forms as Zinfandel, Primitivo, Kratošija, Crljenak kaštelanski or Pribidrag is very simple. The “priority right” has won – the oldest name gets the title! While the first written reference to the name Primitivo dates from 1799 and to Zinfandel from 1837, the first reference to Tribidrag dates all the way back to the 15th century. Etymologically, the name Tribidrag comes from the Greek language and means “early ripening”. The Italian name for this grape variety came from the Latin language (primativus) and means the same “the first to ripen”. The etymological origin of the name Zinfandel has never been discovered and it is considered a mystery… Željko Garmaz — Wine Stories 15 years after it was discovered that Zinfandel was the old Croatian grape variety called Tribidrag or Crljenak, learn the story of Tribidrag and taste the finest Zinfandel, Primitivo and Tribidrag wines at the first International Conference on Tribidrag Wine Variety which will be held on April 27th & 28th, 2017 in Split, Croatia. Speakers include Jancis Robinson, Carole Meredith, José Vouillamoz and more! Click here to … Continue reading “I am Tribidrag” Conference

#WineWednesday Spotlight #72: Piquentum Rouge

For our friend Marcy Gordon, wine and travel writer and founder of Writing Between the Vines, the 2012 Piquentum Rouge is the perfect wine to bright up a rainy winter day: Dark and dreary rainy night in NorCal calls for something bright and deeply satisfying from Croatia. This 2012 Piquentum Teran grown in the white soils of Buzet, Istria is made by Dimitri Brecevic in his awesome wine bunker. It hits the spot with juicy red fruit flavors and the telltale hint of salinity. This is one of the first Terans I fell in love with. It’s drinking beautifully paired with steak quesadillas. #bluedanubewine #wine #piquentum #piquentumwinery #teran #winesofcroatia

Dalmatian Coast, Croatia: A Detox to Retox Adventure!

Stefani Jackenthal is an adventure travel & wine journalist. She likes to write about outdoor activities in wine regions, seeking out sporty, sipping travel destinations. Her latest article about her vacation in Dalmatia, was published in the Huffington Post. Her first producer visit was at Miloš Winery: Our first stop was Miloš Winery, a family-run operation near the Neretva River. Ivan Miloš, one of three winemakers, showed me around the winery and stone caves, explaining their dedication to organic methods and bio diversity. We continued our conversation at the wooden table in the cozy tasting room, as I sampled a handful of wines. I particularly enjoyed the premier Stagnum line, made from Plavac Mali grown on 35-year old vines. Wines spend several years in barrel and bottle before release. The Stagnum 2007 (released in 2015) pleased with chocolate covered cherries, menthol and restrained tannins. While, the Stagnum 2005 was a powerhouse with herbal red fruit aromas and holiday spice, stewed fruit full-body. At the end, Ivan pulled out 1994 Plavic Mali, preserved with a homemade Coravin. The 22-year old wine presented a beefy nose, delicate tannins and complex mocha medium body. It was surprisingly fresh and frisky. Read more about … Continue reading Dalmatian Coast, Croatia: A Detox to Retox Adventure!

#WineWednesday Spotlight #66: Miloš Plavac with Oysters

Since it’s oysters season, here is a contribution from Blue Danubian Stetson Robbins. It comes from a blog post he wrote a while ago. Since then, nothing has changed: he is still crazy for oysters and Plavac! Recently, my mom made friends with a favorite local oysterman. It was rumored that his were the best, so for this most recent visit she order 3½ dozen for just 4 of us. The guy hand delivered his day’s catch to the door. Most were these deliciously fresh, even sweet locally farmed ‘America’ oysters, but the real treat were the dozen strongly flavored wild Belon. Forgoing the typical compliment of Muscadet, or Chablis, I selected something more appropriate for the season. After all, in Maine, winter is the best season for oysters; so why should we drink summer wine? Peljesac wines are some of the most transparent expressions of place and people being bottled today. Paradoxically, it is this individuality that enables them to relate so brilliantly to the culinary traditions of other places. For me, winter oysters in Maine will never be complete without some hearty Plavac. This makes the world feel smaller, but in a good way. In fact, people have … Continue reading #WineWednesday Spotlight #66: Miloš Plavac with Oysters