Visit a Winery: Miloš in Ponikve, Croatia

The Region The former Republic of Dubrovnik was one of the most developed parts of Europe. Dubrovnik city served as the capital and the countryside was important for agriculture, famous for the production of high class olive oil and wines. The Pelješac peninsula has always played a key role since ancient times due to it’s salt beds and proximity to the neighboring, magnificent islands. The longest city walls in Europe were built around the Pelješac to protect against invasions. The Winery Miloš Winery is located just 6 miles away from Ston, where the Pelješac peninsula begins. So a visit is easy even if you are just passing by from Split to Dubrovnik, and don’t have a time to go all the way to the end of Pelješac peninsula. In their underground winery you can observe classic wine production, utilizing old large capacity oak barrels. Finally, there is a well appointed tasting room where you can taste their fine wines. For more adventurous wine lovers, be sure to reserve an off road tour through the vineyards to learn more about organic viticulture and manually farming on steep terraced slopes. Things to do and see Nearby Mali Ston bay is well known … Continue reading Visit a Winery: Miloš in Ponikve, Croatia

Todd Smith of DOSA pairs Indian flavors with Croatian, Slovenian, Hungarian, and Georgian Wines

Todd Smith, wine director for DOSA South Indian restaurants in San Francisco, shares some of his wine pairing discoveries in this interview conducted by Lauren Sloss for Culintro. LS: What’s been the most surprising (and delicious!) pairing that you’ve found? TS: Maybe the first time I properly chilled a Plavac Mali from the Pelješac in Croatia and was super surprised and how it really coaxed out the tropical notes in a Kerala Fish Moilee — a coconut-based curry from the Southwest Coast of India. Todd continues: There are some regions that produce amazing wines, but their economies are struggling and/or their operating costs are so low that they offer top-flight wines for a fraction of the cost of certain unnamed wine producing regions. This is why I love countries with a wine industry such as Slovenia, Croatia, Macedonia, Hungary, Georgia (mostly!)… Read the whole interview here.

Interview with Cliff Rames, founder of “Wines of Croatia”

We caught up with our friend, and New York based sommelier, Cliff Rames, recently to share his thoughts on Croatian wine with you. Cliff also writes the popular blog, Wines of Croatia, which we encourage you to follow! 1. What makes you so passionate about Croatian wine? Well first, my father is from Croatia, so it’s in my blood I guess. When I was 16 years old my dad asked me if I wanted to go visit his birthplace, a small island called Murter off the Dalmatian coast. I said yes, and it forever changed my life. There I learned to drink Turkish coffee and “bevanda” – a mixture of red wine (usually homemade) and water. That kicked off my fascination with the local wine customs and traditions. It was then I also first heard of a mythological place called Dingač, the place from which (I was told by relatives) Croatia’s greatest wine came. I also began to hear words like Plavina, Debit, Babić, Plavac Mali, Pošip – the names of local grape varieties used to make wine. The more I heard and learned, the more I wanted to know! After that, back in the U.S., I found myself searching … Continue reading Interview with Cliff Rames, founder of “Wines of Croatia”

Croatian Wine Regions: A Quick Overview

Vivino user Darko Vozab has put together this helpful, and thorough, guide to Croatia’s wine regions. A perfect introduction to this diverse wine country! Croatia is a must-see European oasis for the wine-minded traveler. Wine production in this land on the eastern shore of the Adriatic Sea began around 2200 B.C., and today Croatia boasts more than 130 indigenous grape varieties, as well as five different climate zones, resulting in a large number of wine styles. Read the rest of the guide here. Browse our Croatian wines.

Why You Need to Taste the New ‘It’ Wines From Croatia and Beyond

Wine writer Lauren Mowery tells you why you need to try wines from Croatia…and elsewhere in Eastern Europe. Start with gorgeous Croatia, a wine-rich culture blessed with a long Adriatic coastline, and continue east, curving around the Black Sea with Moldova, Bulgaria, and Turkey; each country offers indigenous grapes at affordable prices, allowing imbibers to visit far-flung locales, via wine, for less than $20. Read the rest of the article on The Village Voice blog. Try one of the “it” wines recommended by sommelier Cliff Rames, Wines of Croatia: Bibich R6 Riserva

Croatian Wine Tasting at Bistro SF Grill

If you live in the San Francisco Bay Area, you must go visit Bistro SF Grill! It is a cozy, intimate spot in San Francisco’s Lower Pacific Heights neighborhood. Co-owners Gino, Hasim, and Seni make you feel right at home with their slightly Balkan influenced menu and wine list; all three are originally from Bosnia-Herzegovina. We had the pleasure of spending an evening with them this week to celebrate our latest arrival of Croatian wine. The guys put together a flight of 5 wines for guests to choose which included: Bibich Debit, Šipun Žlahtina, Bibich G6 Grenache, Miloš Plavac Mali, and Dubrovački Crljenak Kaštelanski (aka Croatian Zinfandel). It was a fun night of exploration, good conversation, and wine! The experience is not complete without one of their fabulous burgers. I highly recommend the Balkan Burger, which is a lamb patty between pita bread with mint yogurt sauce.

Exploring the Dalmatian Coast and Suha Punta Wines with Marion & Zdravko Podolski

Our friends Marion and Zdravko divide there time between California and Croatia, sharing their experiences through the blog “Go Hvar – Ramblings About a Far Island“. Recently they visited the Dalmatian coast, stopping to tour and taste at Suha Punta winery. Marion and Zdravko have graciously allowed us to share their piece with you. Živjeli (cheers)! Exploring the Dalmatian coast – Primošten, Suha Punta wines and the vineyards of Bucavac Our normal mode of driving north from Hvar is to take the inland motorway. It’s fast and easy, and we’re usually on our way to Zagreb with no time for scenic diversions. But this May we treated ourselves to a more relaxed trip up the magistrala, that wonderfully scenic Croatian coastal road. Setting out from Hvar on a rainy Saturday morning, the clouds gradually cleared as we drove past Trogir, with the road pretty much to ourselves. Coming up towards Primošten, we spotted a large boatyard backed by a spectacular pattern of drystone walls. This was Bucavac, known for good reason as “stone lace“, and looking just like an Oton Gliha painting. (Note: Bucavac is pronounced “Boots-a-vats” as in Croatian “c” is actually “ts”.) These are not terraced vineyards, as … Continue reading Exploring the Dalmatian Coast and Suha Punta Wines with Marion & Zdravko Podolski

Crljenak Kaštelanski — Discovering Zinfandel’s Croatian Roots

The Mrčevlje vineyard above the village of Cavtat where the Dubrovački Crljenak Kaštelanski grows. It is a very exciting time to be a student of wine. DNA fingerprinting has led to many new discoveries about grape varietals, in particular identifying genetic relationships. One such discovery was made in 2001 by University of Davis professor, Carole Meredith. After hearing suggestions that Zinfandel may be related to a Croatian grape, Meredith went to Croatia to collect samples. What she found is that Zinfandel is actually an indigenous Croatian varietal referred to locally as Crljenak Kaštelanski. Other than California, the grape is cultivated extensively in Italy, going by the name Primitivo. Read the full story of how the Original Zinfandel was found in Croatia: here. It has been a long time since we have had a Crljenak Kaštelanski (CK for short) also known as Tribidrag in our portfolio. Many of you sent requests and inquiries so we are pleased to introduce the 2012 Dubrovački Podrumi Crljenak (Zinfandel). Dubrovački Podrumi was founded in 1877 by Kolić Pero, a wine merchant. After World War II, the winery became a state-run operation. In 2000, the winery was bought by local entrepreneurs who revitalized the winemaking program … Continue reading Crljenak Kaštelanski — Discovering Zinfandel’s Croatian Roots

Bibich Lučica 2011, one of W&S Best Eastern European Wines

The new 2011 vintage of the BIBICh Lucica has just received a very nice review published in the current edition of Wine & Spirits Magazine. Check what they say about the wine: Alen Bibic pulls this wine from debit vines his grandfather planted some 50 years ago in Plastovo, a small village hemmed in between Croatia’s vast Krka national park and the Adriatic coast. The dry-farmed bush vines produce very little fruit, which Bibic macerates on the skins for two weeks, and ferments without added yeast in French oak barrels. The result is a wine as rich as its burnished golden hue, with a yeasty, salty aspect that brings fino sherry to mind. As it opens in the glass, it gets fresher, with a crisp tang of an antique apple variety and a corresponding apple-skin grip. The firm structure and freshness suggest that this will age well, although it’s delicious now with a pork chop. We hope you’ll try the wine very soon. This summer, this will be the perfect companion for Spanish tapas.

A Grand Atypical Rosé

One of the most unexpected wines of the season, has to be the Rosé  from Miloš winery in Croatia. Struggling to understand how this atmospheric mineral delight came to be, I called up Ivan Miloš who makes the wine with his father Frano for a little Q and A. And then I hope that like me, you’ll taste and enjoy this “truly serious, grand, atypical wine”. Miloš vineyards: Old vine Plavac amongs walled terraces of Dolomitic limestone. Photo Credit: Frano Miloš Why does Miloš make a Rosé? The Miloš family farm has a very unique location on the Pelješac peninsula at the southern part of Croatia. We are 100% focused on that one spot planted with one grape, Plavac Mali. Combined with the dolomitic limestone of our terraced vineyards, it gives us grapes of such a unique quality, we simply wanted to show the richness of its pure juice, Rosé is the best way to do this. Where did the idea to make a Rosé from the best grapes of the harvest come from? We were tasting rose wines from other appelpations and countries, and we found very few which met our taste. Unfortunately, most rosé are light with almost no structure. We hate … Continue reading A Grand Atypical Rosé