#WineWednesday Spotlight #62: doqi Kisi Qvevri

We just received our shipment of doqi wines, a new label made by the Schuchmann winery, a Georgian wine producer founded by German-born Burkhard Schuchmann. The wines are skillfully vinified by native Georgian Georgi Dakishvili, a third generation winemaker. The doqi wines come in two styles: “Euro style”, fresh and fermented in stainless steel, and “Qvevri”, the traditional Georgian way of making wine in clay vessel buried in the ground. Read what wine professional Kerry Winslow has to say about the doqi Kisi Qvevri over at grapelive.com: For a long time we though of Georgia as a red wine making country, though in fact, something that I learned recent at a brilliant seminar given by Lisa Granik MW, it is white wine which is most made/grown in Georgia, with grapes like this Kisi, and Mtsvane, as well as the most widely planted varietal Rkatsiteli. The Doqi Kisi Qvervi is a skin contact white with lovely aromatics and fine texture with tannic vibrancy and slightly cloudy showing a light pink/yellow tint, it is an “Orange” wine, though not as savory or as wildly funky as some, this would be a great way to start your exploration into Georgian traditional wine, Doqi … Continue reading #WineWednesday Spotlight #62: doqi Kisi Qvevri

Uncorking the Caucasus: Wines from Turkey, Armenia, and Georgia

In May 2015—after four years of deliberating and planning together—Charine Tan and Dr Matthew Horkey sold almost all of their possessions, dropped the comfort and security of their lucrative careers, and left Singapore to travel around the world with a dream of building a location-independent business and to absorb the world’s lessons. Driven by a common passion for wine, they ended up diverting all their attention and resources to the self-study of wine as they travelled through Western Europe, the Caucasus, ex-Yugoslavia, and Mexico. Uncorking the Caucasus is the first of a series of wine travel books that they will be writing. They also share wine travel tips, videos, wine-related stories, and exciting finds from lesser-known wine regions on their website exoticwinetravel.com. When prompted about the name “Exotic Wine Travel”, the duo explained that the problem with lesser-known wine regions and exotic wines is that too often, visitors bounce around a country swiftly and end up tasting some substandard, local wines. For that reason, Charine and Matthew aim to explore some of the lesser-known wine regions and introduce the readers to the best they have to offer with even some anecdotal insight into their peculiarity. This should encourage wine lovers … Continue reading Uncorking the Caucasus: Wines from Turkey, Armenia, and Georgia

Geoffrey Roberts Award for Vinologue Georgia, a new wine guide to the “cradle of wine”

In 2016, the Geoffrey Roberts Award, which commemorates the work of wine merchant Geoffrey Roberts and his lifelong interest in wine, went to Miquel Hudin, author of the Vinologue collection of enotourism books. Miquel applied for the award to help him create a comprehensive wine tourism guide to the up-and-coming wine region of Kakheti in Georgia with full winery and region profiles as well as hundreds of wine tasting notes. This will be Miquel’s 9th Vinologue book. Previous titles include Dalmatia, Empordà, Herzegovina, Menorca, Montsant, Priorat, and Stellenbosch. The award has helped fund the initial research but in order to complete this project, Miquel has also created a kickstarter. If you’re interested in the wines of Georgia and/or plan to visit the country, you can support this project or preorder the book at the Vinologue online shop.

#WineWednesday Spotlight #38: Kindzmarauli Marani Rkatsiteli

Contributed by Christine Havens, Portland-based wine writer and former winemaker who has become a Vivino featured user with over 37,000 followers largely thanks to her wine ratings. An early adopter, Ms. Havens has been sharing her reviews with fellow users since the app hit the US market in late fall 2011. She also frequently contributes articles and wine pairing recommendations to the news section of the app. Original review can be found here. From the foothills of Georgia’s Caucus Mountains, is this softly-hewn Rkatsiteli. Interestingly, this is a variety that was planted in my former estate vineyard, in a single test row. Kindzmarauli’s interpretation of this ancient, indigenous white brings back memories. Bruised pear, dried orange peel and wild prairie flowers. Full and round in the mouth, like a welcome embrace, with low acidity and rather vinous orchard fruit and dried pineapple overtones. Try the Kindzmarauli Marani Rkatsiteli yourself! You can order it here.

Reviving an 8,000-year-old winemaking tradition in Georgia

Author and New York Times food columnist Melissa Clark recently interviewed John Wurdeman, an American painter who moved to the Georgian Republic to follow his two passions—wine and art—and funded the winery Pheasant’s Tears. Melissa Clark: How did this all start for you? John Wurdeman: I’m a visual artist, a painter by profession. I fell deeply in love with Georgia when I heard a recording when I was sixteen years old. I bought a CD called Georgian Folk Music Today. Immediately, the chords of the music just struck me very deeply. In 1995, I was able to go to Georgia for the first time. Strangely enough, on the very first night, I was whisked away from the airport and taken to a restaurant. About 10-15 toasts deep into the feast, musicians were summoned to come in, and they were the same musicians that were on the CD I bought when I was 16, back in Richmond, Virginia. MC: That’s amazing. And how did you go from there to making wine? JW: I came back in 1996. I needed a subject for my final painting. My master’s project that I was working on was in Moscow, so I decided to follow … Continue reading Reviving an 8,000-year-old winemaking tradition in Georgia

The weird and wonderful wines from the Republic of Georgia

Wine columnist Allison Alevine also attended the Republic of Georgia Wine seminar in Los Angeles last June. Georgia was a wine-producing country that she knew very little about and as such, she was excited by this opportunity to explore what might be the oldest wine-making region. I knew tasting the wines of Georgia would be different. But as they came around and poured the wines, a wine novice would question what was in front of them. Instead of the bright lemon or golden colors of white wines, the white wines ranged from yellow and golden to pale peach and orange. The red wines, however, are more the typical shades of purple, ruby and garnet that we are familiar with. The wines are made in large vessels called qvevri, which means “below.” These are concrete tanks built underground. If you are a fan of “The Amazing Race,” you will understand what I am talking about as this past season the teams were required as one of their challenges to clean out grapes skins from the qvevri at a winery in Georgia. Several of our wines were among her favorites: Orgo Kisi, Kakheti 2013 (fermented in gvevri, skin contact) – A hazy … Continue reading The weird and wonderful wines from the Republic of Georgia

Orange Wine Is a Summer Day-Drinking Revelation

When was the last time you heard someone shout “rosé all day?” Was it Fourth of July weekend at a friend’s BBQ, or maybe out on the patio at Everson Royce? America has undoubtedly hit peak rosé, but there is another beverage that falls between white and red on the color spectrum: orange wine. LA Weekly wine writer Erin Mosbaugh recently attended the Republic of Georgia Wine Seminar at République LA in Los Angeles. One of the highlights of the seminar was Wine Guru Lou Amdur‘s presentation on orange wines. Curious about this unique winemaking style traditionally found in Georgia, Slovenia and Italy, she asked République’s beverage director Taylor Parsons about his favorite orange wines. One of them was Kabaj Rebula 2012 from Slovenia: Jean-Michel Morel is one of the great practitioners of skin maceration, partially because of the time he spent learning the technique in the Shavnabada Monastery in Georgia. His Rebula is the best entry into his outstanding range of wines. Thirty days on the skins adds a wonderful textural complexity as well as spicy, woodsy flavors, and the wonderful natural acidity of the grape keeps everything fresh and balanced. Another favorite was Gotsa Family Wines Mtsvane 2013 … Continue reading Orange Wine Is a Summer Day-Drinking Revelation

#WineWednesday Spotlight #31: Kindzmarauli Marani Original

Continuing our celebration of Georgian wine month with Kindzmarauli Marani Original semi-sweet saperavi. The wine has been getting plenty of well deserved attention this month. Here are two independent reviews of the wine. One is by Tara Q. Thomas, Eastern European wine critic for Wine & Spirits Magazine, and the other is a video by James the Wine Guy, San Francisco-based wine vlogger. Kindzmarauli Marani Original 2014 (Best Buy) 90 points This saperavi is made in the traditional semi-sweet style but its not at all cloying. Rather, it tastes like wild cherries, from the leaves to the pits, intense in their clarity, then fades into a steaky, cedary savor. Its like the red version of a good Spätlese riesling, the sweetness serving to bolster flavor, and balance the strong acidity. And like a good Spätlese, this can go with a wide range of foods, in this case from grilled eggplant to seared steak to chunks of dark chocolate. -Tara Q. Thomas, Wine & Spirits Magazine June issue Now enjoy the video review by James the Wine Guy. He gives the wine 92 points citing its versatility at the table and the fact that it’s “not cloyingly sweet” as part of … Continue reading #WineWednesday Spotlight #31: Kindzmarauli Marani Original

Georgian Wine Historian Video

Check out this great video showing Giorgi Barisashvili, Georgian wine historian and educator, visiting the wine regions of Western Georgia. There he talks about rare, indigenous grapes and traditional Georgian winemaking practices. Last year a few members of our team were fortunate enough to meet Giorgi and spend some time with him in his marani (wine cellar). Here are a few pictures from that meeting: Browse all Georgian wines.

#WineWednesday Spotlight #30: Gotsa Chinuri

Review originally published in the June edition of Wine & Spirits Magazine. Written by Tara Q. Thomas. Tara has been a wine writer for about 15 years, mainly at Wine & Spirits, where she is the Executive Editor and the wine critic for wines of Austria, Germany, Hungary, Eastern Europe and the Mediterranean. A Wine & Spirits Wine of the Month for June! 2014 Gotsa Chinuri Beka Gotsadze grows 13 varieties in his vineyards in the hills of the Asureti Valley, at an elevation of 4,200. He works organically, and exclusively with qvevri (the local amphorae), though his techniques are not exactly traditional: His fermentation qvevri have holes drilled in their bottoms so that he can transfer the juice into aging qvevri by gravity; those qvevri are wrapped in silicon tubing that carries cool water from a nearby spring. Perhaps this is how he’s attained such a complex, delicate wine, as crisp and saline as it is redolent of orange blossoms, marzipan and salted capers. The tannins give it an edge of bitter tea, while the acidity keeps the wine lifted and fresh. It feels like it could age for decades; it lasts on the countertop indefinitely, and is especially … Continue reading #WineWednesday Spotlight #30: Gotsa Chinuri