#WineWednesday Spotlight #70: Gotsa Mtsvane

With 94 points out of 100, the Gotsa Mtsvane 2013 was one of James Melendez AKA James the Wine Guy‘s top Top 100 Wines for 2016: Exotic wood, citrus peel, lemon tones, cardamon and white flowers, gorgeous. When you’re tasting this wine, you’re thinking it’s going to be really sweet. No, it’s not, it’s completely dry. So on the very very initial contact with the palate, it’s giving this expression of a dry white wine or dry orange wine I’d better say, and gives some coarse notes of fresh Turkish fig, pomegranate, white flower, stones, and honey tones as well. Watch the video: Gotsa Babaneuri Valley Mtsvane ’13 94 Points Check our selection of outstanding Qvevri fermented wines from Gotsa here. Find out James’ favorite wines for 2016. Among them, a few from Blue Danube Wine Co.: Kindzmarauli Kakhetian Royal 2013 – 93 Points: video Muhr-van der Niepoort Samt & Seide 2012 – 94 Points: video Samuel Tinon Birtok 2014 – 94 Points Samuel Tinon Szent Tamás 2015 – 93 Points Shumi Tsinandali 2014 – 94 points Santé!

Kadarka, Cadarca, Gamza

Based in the South of France, Master of Wine Elizabeth Gabay has contributed on Provence and Hungary for winetravelguides.com and has updated the Provence sections for both Jancis Robinson’s The World Atlas of Wine and Oz Clarke’s annual pocket wine book. An active educator, she works on the MW education program, gives masterclasses and runs a local wine tasting group. Hungary is increasingly looking to its vinous history and indigenous varieties. There is a growing number of winemakers, who, with the help of research institutes like the one at Pécs, are replanting varieties which were almost lost during the phylloxera epidemic. Kadarka is one of those varieties now seeing a revival. It also happens to be my current favourite variety. Recent research suggests that an ancestor of Kadarka, the Papazkarası variety found in the Strandja region of Thrace, on the border between Bulgaria and Turkey, was taken westwards and planted around Lake Scutari on the modern Albania-Montenegro border. There, it was crossed with a local variety, Skardarsko, creating Kadarka. It would have stayed little more than a local variety if political events had not intervened. In 1689 the Ottoman army defeated the Austrians and, in fear of further attacks, the … Continue reading Kadarka, Cadarca, Gamza

A Brief Intro to Georgian Wines and Where to Get Them

“Yes, these are the orange wines you’ve been hearing about but don’t call them that to a Georgian,” writes wine writer and editor Eileen Duffy. This Thanksgiving city dwellers might do well to consider wines from Georgia (as in the country) to accompany their turkey feast. Thanks to a recent push by Brooklynite and Master of Wine Lisa Granik, more and more retailers and sommeliers are putting the wines on their shelves and wine lists. Granik works as the market adviser for the National Wine Agency and has been bringing visitors to see the dramatic landscapes and vineyards where, many say, wine was first made around 6,000 BCE as evidenced by pips dating to that era. Georgian wines are mostly white and fermented and aged with the skin on, which results in an amber colored wine. Yes, these are the orange wines you’ve been hearing about but don’t call them that to a Georgian, or to Granik for that matter. “These are amber wines,” she says. “Not orange. First, because they’re not made from oranges and because they really are amber in color.” What makes these wines great with turkey, stuffing, roasted Brussels sprouts and even pumpkin pie? Read the … Continue reading A Brief Intro to Georgian Wines and Where to Get Them

#WineWednesday Spotlight #62: doqi Kisi Qvevri

We just received our shipment of doqi wines, a new label made by the Schuchmann winery, a Georgian wine producer founded by German-born Burkhard Schuchmann. The wines are skillfully vinified by native Georgian Georgi Dakishvili, a third generation winemaker. The doqi wines come in two styles: “Euro style”, fresh and fermented in stainless steel, and “Qvevri”, the traditional Georgian way of making wine in clay vessel buried in the ground. Read what wine professional Kerry Winslow has to say about the doqi Kisi Qvevri over at grapelive.com: For a long time we though of Georgia as a red wine making country, though in fact, something that I learned recent at a brilliant seminar given by Lisa Granik MW, it is white wine which is most made/grown in Georgia, with grapes like this Kisi, and Mtsvane, as well as the most widely planted varietal Rkatsiteli. The Doqi Kisi Qvervi is a skin contact white with lovely aromatics and fine texture with tannic vibrancy and slightly cloudy showing a light pink/yellow tint, it is an “Orange” wine, though not as savory or as wildly funky as some, this would be a great way to start your exploration into Georgian traditional wine, Doqi … Continue reading #WineWednesday Spotlight #62: doqi Kisi Qvevri

#WineWednesday Spotlight #50: Carić Bogdanjuša

British-born and wine lover Paul Bradbury — who has made the island of Hvar his adopted homeland — recently launched Total Croatia Wine, a new website dedicated to Croatian wine tourism, winemakers, wine festivals and wine shops and bars. The site has also a useful section on indigenous Croatian grapes, including this article on Bogdanjuša, a unique white grape varietal native to the island. If you’ve never been on the Croatian island of Hvar, you’ve probably never had Bogdanuša wine, an autochthonous white wine, found almost exclusively on that island – that has been, as legend has it, grown there since the time of the ancient Greeks. Originally found on the Stari Grad Plain, a cultural landscape protected by UNESCO that has remained practically intact since it was first colonized by Greeks in the 4th century BC and where vines were one of the major crops, along with the olives. It is a white wine of a very rich greenish-yellow colour, unexpectedly fresh taste (with just the right amount of bitterness that is rarely found in other wines from the Croatian islands) and quite low alcohol content, almost always around 12%. Those that like bogdanuša will tell you that its … Continue reading #WineWednesday Spotlight #50: Carić Bogdanjuša

The weird and wonderful wines from the Republic of Georgia

Wine columnist Allison Alevine also attended the Republic of Georgia Wine seminar in Los Angeles last June. Georgia was a wine-producing country that she knew very little about and as such, she was excited by this opportunity to explore what might be the oldest wine-making region. I knew tasting the wines of Georgia would be different. But as they came around and poured the wines, a wine novice would question what was in front of them. Instead of the bright lemon or golden colors of white wines, the white wines ranged from yellow and golden to pale peach and orange. The red wines, however, are more the typical shades of purple, ruby and garnet that we are familiar with. The wines are made in large vessels called qvevri, which means “below.” These are concrete tanks built underground. If you are a fan of “The Amazing Race,” you will understand what I am talking about as this past season the teams were required as one of their challenges to clean out grapes skins from the qvevri at a winery in Georgia. Several of our wines were among her favorites: Orgo Kisi, Kakheti 2013 (fermented in gvevri, skin contact) – A hazy … Continue reading The weird and wonderful wines from the Republic of Georgia

Georgian Wine Historian Video

Check out this great video showing Giorgi Barisashvili, Georgian wine historian and educator, visiting the wine regions of Western Georgia. There he talks about rare, indigenous grapes and traditional Georgian winemaking practices. Last year a few members of our team were fortunate enough to meet Giorgi and spend some time with him in his marani (wine cellar). Here are a few pictures from that meeting: Browse all Georgian wines.

Happy 52nd Anniversary to the Dingač Appellation

Originally published by Marija Mrgudić on Facebook. Republished here with permission. Marija Mrgudić is a distinguished wine maker in Orebić on the Pelješac peninsula in Croatia. The Bura-Mrgudić family winery makes internationally renowned wines in the premier cru vineyards Dingač and Postup. English translation courtesy of Zdravko Podolski. 52 Years of the Dingač Brand Fifty two years ago, on May 13th 1964, the name ‘Dingač’ was first registered. The Dingač Cooperative in Potomje on the Pelješac peninsula, received its certificate from the International Bureaux for the Protection of Industrial, Literary, and Artistic Property (Bureaux Internationaux reunis pour la protection da la propriete industrielle, litteraire et artistique Geneve – now subsumed into the World International Property Organisation). Dingač thus became the very first internationally protected wine from the former Yugoslavia. It was protected and listed as top quality wine, based on a study for the determination of properties of top quality red wines  from the Dingač area. The study was prepared by experts from the Split Institute for Adriatic Culture, according to the Geneva Convention on Intellectual Property. The whole process was started by the renowned Marcel Jelaska, and it was the first such effort by the Institute. 1961 was the … Continue reading Happy 52nd Anniversary to the Dingač Appellation

Drink Your Way Through Austrian Wine

This guide by Wine Folly makes it easy to learn more about Austria’s key wine grapes and styles: Grüner Veltliner, Zweigelt, Blaufränkisch, Saint Laurent, Riesling, Gemischter Satz, and Sekt. Austrian wines are mostly made in the eastern side of the country (where the major population areas are) and the cooler continental climate produces racy, dry white wines and elegant, fruity reds. This is not a region for rich, opulent wines like what you’ll find in much of California and Australia. Instead, Austrian wines lean towards tart, herbaceous flavors in a style more akin to France. So, if you’re a Francophile when it comes to wine preference, Austrian wine has that certain je ne sais quoi. Shop Austrian wines

3 Wines from Central Europe You Need To Know Now

Bottlenotes recommends adding these three Central European wines to your repertoire. For the past decade, wines from Central and Eastern Europe have been something of a sommelier secret stateside. The names can be hard to pronounce (hárslevelű, anyone?), but the best bottles offer exceptional value and tend to work extremely well with food. Here are the three recommended wines: Samuel Tinon Furmint Birtok (Tokaj, Hungary) Sommeliers and wine insiders have been raving about furmint for years. The grape, which is commonly used to make Hungary’s famous sweet wines, also makes an intriguing dry wine with medium- to full-body and high acidity (read: an ideal wine to pair with food). Piquentum Blanc (Istria, Croatia) Croatia may have initially gained some international fame for its red wines, but many sommeliers now feel that the white Malvasia coming out of the country is some of the best representations of the grape in Europe. When made in a dry style, it makes a crisp wine with some weight in the body, similar to dry Chenin Blanc. Orgo Rkatsiteli (Kakheti, Georgia) Georgian wines can be tricky to pin down from producer to producer. Some are quite rustic and oxidative, while a growing number offer more … Continue reading 3 Wines from Central Europe You Need To Know Now