Moldy grapes are better

Most of the 2018 fruit is in across the portfolio, and seeing all of the harvest action over social media is a reminder of how diverse and special these places are. In particular, there’s the ubiquitous “perfect cluster photo” phenomenon. For the vast majority of the wine world, it’s a shiny perfect looking uniform cluster. My feed is full of botrytis ridden desiccated clusters. Speaking of botrytis, whether fermented dry, off dry, under flor or sweet, tons of brand new wines from Samuel Tinon, Oszkár Maurer, Demeter Zoltán, Bodrog Borműhely, Kikelet and Fekete Béla have just landed. On the opposite side of the spectrum, the new Gere Olaszrizling, Káli-Kövek Olaszrizling and Juhfark, and Szőke Mátyás Irsai Olivér have the brightness, salt, and aromatics to tackle the final weeks of summer and transition into the fall. First, let me properly introduce Oszkár Maurer from Subotičko – Horgoškoj, Serbia. Oszkár is ethnically Hungarian, and the region, formally known as the Szerémség, was Hungarian for hundreds of years. Due to the sandy soils piled up between the Danube and Sava rivers, many grapes are still own-rooted and planted as far back as 1880. The nearby Fruška-Gora (Tarcal in Hungarian) mountains bring volcanic soils … Continue reading Moldy grapes are better

#WineWednesday Spotlight #151: Maurer Kövidinka

Oszkar Maurer’s winery is located in the Subotica (or Szabadka in Hungarian) wine region in Serbia, just south of the Hungarian-Serbian border. This is where he traditionally and organically farms 6 acres planted to native grape varieties such as Szerémi zöld, Bakator, Mézes fehér, Kövidinka, and Kadarka. Many of these grapes are more than a hundred years old. The Szerémi zöld and Bakator were planted in 1909, the Kövidinka in 1925, and the oldest Kadarka was planted in 1880, which makes it the oldest Kadarka in the world. The Kövidinka grapes are sourced from a low-yielding 93-year-old vineyard, manually tended and still plowed with horses. The wine was spontaneously fermented with native yeast and made with low sulphur. Also low in alcohol (10.2%), it is light, dry, and crisp, with distinctive stony flavors, a creamy mouthfeel, and a fresh finish. It’s a lovely wine, perfect for the last warm weather nights of the season. Sip it with appetizers, a fresh salad or a cheese platter. You can get it here.