Reviving an 8,000-year-old winemaking tradition in Georgia

Author and New York Times food columnist Melissa Clark recently interviewed John Wurdeman, an American painter who moved to the Georgian Republic to follow his two passions—wine and art—and funded the winery Pheasant’s Tears. Melissa Clark: How did this all start for you? John Wurdeman: I’m a visual artist, a painter by profession. I fell deeply in love with Georgia when I heard a recording when I was sixteen years old. I bought a CD called Georgian Folk Music Today. Immediately, the chords of the music just struck me very deeply. In 1995, I was able to go to Georgia for the first time. Strangely enough, on the very first night, I was whisked away from the airport and taken to a restaurant. About 10-15 toasts deep into the feast, musicians were summoned to come in, and they were the same musicians that were on the CD I bought when I was 16, back in Richmond, Virginia. MC: That’s amazing. And how did you go from there to making wine? JW: I came back in 1996. I needed a subject for my final painting. My master’s project that I was working on was in Moscow, so I decided to follow … Continue reading Reviving an 8,000-year-old winemaking tradition in Georgia

Is the Country of Georgia the Next Great Wine Destination?

We think yes! The wines are truly distinct and the country is gorgeous. Tara Isabella Burton writes about her experience in Georgia for The Wall Street Journal. The entire original article can be read here. Traveling through Georgia, the tiny post-Soviet country set between the Caucasus and the Black Sea, is always a metabolic endurance test. Wine, brandy, chacha—a grape-skin moonshine with the flavor of gasoline schnapps—all these are habitually, exuberantly, foisted upon any foreigner who sits still long enough. But in the country’s primary wine region of Kakheti—according to Georgians, the birthplace of wine itself—consumption seems to be the primary occupation. Browse Georgian wines. For an easy introduction to the wines of Georgia, try our 6-Pack Georgian Discovery Sampler

Wines from Central and Eastern Europe are turning American heads

Check the story called “East goes West — Wines from Central and Eastern Europe are turning American heads” in the latest issue of Imbibe Magazine. With interviews of Jeff Berlin, sommelier at À Côté, Michelle Polzine, owner of 20th Century Cafe, Paul Einbund, wine director for Frances and Octavia in San Francisco, Henry Beylin, sommelier of Los Angeles’ Gjelina, and our own Frank Dietrich, wine writer Jennifer Fiedler explores how wines from Central and Eastern Europe—what she calls the older Old World—are steadily making their way westward to some of the best restaurants’ wine lists. Twenty years ago, a Plavac Mali or Rebula would have been a rare find on an American wine list of any stature, much less at a tiny local bistro or neighborhood wine shop. But what began as a small trickle of quality Central and Eastern European wine into U.S. markets—a Hungarian dry Furmint here, a Georgian Saperavi there—has gradually grown to a steady stream, buoyed by support from dedicated importers, enthusiastic sommeliers, and a public eager to explore wines outside of the traditional canon. “[These wines] are very unique, and very expressive of where they come from,” says Jeff Berlin, sommelier at À Côté in … Continue reading Wines from Central and Eastern Europe are turning American heads

Emerging Wine Regions: Georgia

  With one of the oldest wine making traditions in the world, Georgia is believed by many to be the birthplace of wine making. DNA evidence has shown that wine was made in the region at least 7,000 years ago! The Middle Ages was a golden period for winemaking in Georgia. As in Burgundy, local monks and farmers studied the terroir and plant the best grapes in the best areas. Read the rest of the article by Bottlenotes to find out why Georgian wines are “on the tip of every hip somm’s tongue”. Try the recommended Pheasant’s Tears wines.

A Reverence for Georgia Wines

Christy Canterbury MW shares her recent experiences trekking through Georgia’s Kakheti wine region with Snooth. In this dramatically rugged Caucasus Mountains country, wine is holy…Wine is part of the Georgians’ sacred trinity, along with the motherland and the mother language. Read the whole article here. We can help you try 3 out of the 4 wines recommended! Bagrationi and Pheasant’s Tears can be found in our webshop.