#WineWednesday Spotlight #167: Trapl Sankt Laurent Reserve

A great review from The Wine Enthusiast Magazine for the Trapl Sankt Laurent Reserve: 94 Points The dark allure of elderberry and black cherry has to be teased out on the nose. It is the elderberry that gives this a medicinal, herbaceous tinge. The palate is wonderfully and enticingly tart at first but then presents the purity of ripe, black cherry. Tannins are fine and have a little crunch, and pervasive freshness keeps this elegant and sinuous. Drink 2020–2030. The small wine-growing region of Carnuntum, where the Trapl winery is located, stretches from the eastern limits of Vienna to the border of Slovakia. In the past, Carnuntum was known for big, inexpensive Zweigelt wines. But today, this historic wine region is making a come-back and Johannes Trapl has been one of the pioneers behind its revival. His vineyards have been certified organic since 2006 and the entire winery since 2010. The wine, from Sankt Laurent, a highly aromatic grape variety from the Pinot Noir family, was fermented with native yeasts with no additives. It’s silky like a Pinot and perfectly balanced. Pair it with duck or even salmon.

Schist Happens

The first time we starting turning over rocks and looking for producers in Eisenberg was 2014. The area is certainly thematically ripe for Blue Danube given the confluence of Croatian, Austrian and Hungarian cultures and borders. A stone’s throw from the Hungarian border and a part of the Hungarian Empire for centuries earlier, but the Croatian connection is less obvious. After the Turks were pushed out in the mid 16th Century, Hungary repopulated the war torn area with Croatian communities. For centuries, villages like Schandorf spoke a unique Croatian dialect and the culture was distinctly Croatian. This was the case up until 1921 when the borders changed, empires fell, and then were broken up again with the Iron Curtain. Things have of course perked up since then, but Südburgenland is still one of Austria’s smallest wine regions, and specific areas like Eisenberg are even lesser known. Needless to say, the region’s wines are underrepresented in the US. As such we are proud to introduce Kopfensteiner. Largely committed to Blaufränkisch, Thomas and Astrid have 9 hectares in Eisenberg and 6 hectares in nearby Deutsch Schützen planted in iron rich clay, loam and layers of green schist. Combined with the highest elevation … Continue reading Schist Happens